Thinking Like a Woman Could Pay Off With Credit Cards

Women shop a lot: We make 85% of all consumer purchases, according to data from the research firms Yankelovich Monitor and Greenfield Online. All that shopping means we’re pulling out our credit cards often — and it turns out, perhaps thanks to all that practice, we really know what we’re doing.

On average, women carry about $100 less credit card debt than men do ($5,536 versus $5,635), are less likely to be 60 or more days overdue on their credit card card payments, and have slightly higher credit scores (675 versus 670), according to the credit bureau Experian. “Women seem to be doing a better job at managing their credit,” says Kelley Motley, director of analytics at Experian.

Men might want to take a page from women’s credit card playbook by adopting these four credit card habits.

  1. Don’t be scared to use credit cards responsibly

Women have 23.5% more open credit cards than men do, according to Experian. Despite that, women have lower average overall balances, which suggests they are opening more cards without maxing them out. In other words, they might be opening new ones to strategically score discounts or other benefits, but for the most part, they aren’t getting into trouble by running up massive balances with them. That means many women are reaping the rewards of credit cards — fraud protection, points, discounts — without winding up with crushing credit card debt.

“Rather than just using one card, they may be using different cards, with different rewards structures, to make certain purchases,” says Catey Hill, author of the forthcoming book “The 30-Minute Money Plan for Moms: How to Maximize Your Family Budget in Minimal Time.” “If you pay them off on time and in full each month, rewards cards, even multiple rewards cards, can be very lucrative.”

  1. Understand behaviors that can improve credit scores

Men were more likely than women to say they considered their credit score knowledge good or excellent — 61% vs. 54% — according to a recent survey by the Consumer Federation of America and VantageScore Solutions. But women were actually the ones who reported more accurate knowledge on many factors about how credit scores work. Women had a better understanding of how to raise a credit score and of the factors used in determining credit scores.

“Women might be slightly more conscientious than men about knowing and understanding their credit scores,” said Stephen Brobeck, executive director of CFA. And as for understanding the actions that can raise credit scores, including making on-time payments every month and maintaining a low credit utilization rate, “that’s the most critical information to have,” Brobeck said.

  1. Get your free credit reports regularly

The CFA survey also found that women are more likely than men to understand the importance of checking their credit reports regularly, something all consumers can do for free at annualcreditreport.com. The reports do not include credit scores, but rather the details of one’s credit history. This makes it possible to spot any errors and work to correct them.

According to the survey, women may also be more likely than men to follow through and obtain their credit report — 67% of women said they’d done so, versus 63% of men.

  1. Avoid delinquencies and maintain low, manageable balances

A late payment or delinquency can lower a credit score. Making regular monthly payments to keep all credit cards (and other accounts) in good standing is an important part of building a strong credit history.

“Women are typically the CEOs of their household and know how to stick to a monthly budget, manage day-to-day spending and pay bills on time,” says Kerry Hannon, personal finance expert and author of the forthcoming book “Money Confidence: Really Smart Financial Moves for Newly Single Women.” “When they sense they’re in debt or bumping up against a shortfall, they trim back their budget, slashing discretionary items like meals out or clothing purchases.”

That kind of fiscal conservatism helps prevent a buildup of credit card debt. Plus, keeping balances manageable can help improve your credit utilization ratio, which is a factor in your credit score.

After all, when it comes to your credit score, how you manage your money matters more than the size of your paycheck. While women typically bring home only about 80% of what men do, according to the American Association of University Women, they still come out on top when it comes to credit scores.

“It shows you don’t have to earn a ton to manage your money well, and that you can take control of your finances even on a smaller budget,” says Hill, the author.

In other words, shop like a woman and you might just end up with a better credit score.

This article was written by NerdWallet and was originally published by Forbes.

More about credit cards

Kimberly Palmer is a writer at NerdWallet. Email: kpalmer@nerdwallet.com. Twitter: @KimberlyPalmer.

The article Thinking Like a Woman Could Pay Off With Credit Cards originally appeared on NerdWallet.

 

Card Valet Is Now Part Of VCNB Mobile!

Many of our customers have been using a mobile app called Card Valet to exercise control over their VCNB cards. The app is genuinely useful because it allows you, the customer, to turn your card off when you’re not using it, to set spending limits and to even determine where your card can be used.

In this age of fraudulent activity, this app has been a sensation among customers who use it.

So, many of you will be pleased to know that Card Valet services are now part of the bank’s mobile app, VCNB Mobile. No more will you need two separate apps – our app does all the work!

Here’s what that means to you:

Get started by logging in to VCNB Mobile. If you don’t currently use the app, read more about the app and how to get it by clicking here.

On the Accounts Page, find and select the Manage My Cards option at the bottom.

On the next page you can set rules for each card attached to your account. Each card is treated individually, making it easily customizeable.

One of the most popular features is the Block Card option. This allows you to temporarily block transactions except pending or recurring transactions. By blocking the card, you are essentially turning the card off. It takes just a few seconds to turn it back on so some customers turn their card on while they stand in line and turn it back off again when they’re done using it.

The Set Card Limits option is also useful. Here you can set it so that a single transaction cannot exceed an amount you choose. You can also block card transactions outside a defined geographic area or limit the merchants where your card can be used. There are several categories to choose from including restaurants, department stores, groceries, gas stations and entertainment. You may want to block all categories except gas stations and groceries. It’s up to you! Easily turn off and on categories at your convenience!

As always, you can use Online Banking to set Account Alerts for a number of reasons, including alerts to notify you when your card has been swiped or when a purchase as cleared.

This is just one of many ways VCNB is working to make banking easier and safer for you! Check out these new options in VCNB Mobile and tell us what you think!

 

A Presidential Portrait: Ron Collins

In honor of our 150th anniversary in 2017 we are taking a look back at bank history and the people who have helped to shape our bank into the successful, secure institution that it is today. Read on to learn about one of our former presidents!

Collins

Ron Collins has been the Vinton County Bank President since 2009.

Ron Collins is the ninth and most recent President of Vinton County National Bank. As the only President to preside over both the Bremen and Vinton County Banks, Ron has provided a helpful bridge between the two bank cultures and operations.

Ron came to Bremen in 1998 to serve as Head of Lending. Before that, he worked as Field Vice President for ITT Financial Services from 1976 to 1993 and then as Vice President of Consumer Lending for State Savings Bank from 1993 to 1998.

He was named President of the First Bremen Bank in 2001 and served in that capacity until being named President of Vinton County National Bank in 2009.

Ron brought to the bank a comprehensive understanding of the lending world that has benefited the bank greatly. He used this experience and worked closely with the Credit Department to address weaknesses in the bank’s loan portfolio. He has since improved the bank’s loan portfolio to make it both healthy and profitable.

One of Ron’s most noted accomplishments during his time as President at Bremen continues to impact the bank today. Ron oversaw the development of the Canal Banking Center in Canal Winchester.

The bank built this office from the ground up in a location that was outside the bank’s comfort zone at the time. Ron advocated for a location in an up-and-coming commercial area off the highway rather than in a downtown location. The Canal office opened in 2002 and was an immediate success. It continues to be a busy, growing branch.

Ron also oversaw ventures into Licking county where Bremen opened its fifth location. The Friendly Bremen Bank of Pataskala opened in 2006.

After being named Vinton County National Bank President in 2009, Ron set to work softening the differences between the two banks, finding common grounds and seeking ways to streamline and improve the combined operation.

Ron is known as a great communicator and many consider him a “President of the people.” His ability to relate to people of all walks of life have served him well at this bank as he is approachable to all and open to their thoughts.

He considers it an honor to be the bank’s President and calls it “a privilege to follow a long history of outstanding leaders.” He credits current employees and those who have come before with helping grow the bank from one office in one county to sixteen offices in seven counties with assets of $885 million.

Ron says that his greatest accomplishment is being able to work with “all the hard working and dedicated employees in keeping with our bank’s history of
outstanding growth while maintaining our principles of being part of the communities we serve and having a safe and sound bank.”

Born in Dayton in 1955, Ron has been married to his wife Gail for 37 years. The pair have two children, Jill and Ron, Jr. as well as three grandchildren. He is a graduate of the Stonier Graduate School of Banking. Ron serves as Board Treasurer for Fox Family YMCA, is a member of the Lancaster Chamber of Commerce Board and is a past board member for the Route 33 Alliance. In his free time, Ron enjoys traveling, fishing and spending time with his grandchildren.

Daniel Will
Aaron Will
John L. Will
Robert B. Will, Sr.
J.G. Will
Robert B. Will Jr.
George Booth
Steve Hunter

VCNB Mobile: Banking Made Easier

If you hang around our Facebook page very long, you will figure out that we are enamored with VCNB Mobile, our mobile banking application. With VCNB Mobile, you can access your account information with a password or even with your fingerprint, if your phone allows. There are tons of features that make this a quick and easy way to securely access your banking information.

As you might expect, you can transfer funds among accounts, check balances and pay bills but did you know about these other features?

Instant Balance
Just need to know your balances? Simply tap the icon at the top of your log in screen to securely view your balances!

Mobile Deposit
Use your mobile phone to deposit a check! Mobile Deposit uses your phone’s built in camera to take pictures of your check and submits the images electronically to make a deposit to your desired checking or savings accounts. When using Mobile Deposit, remember to endorse your checks “For Mobile Deposit Only” for them to be accepted.

CardValet
A relatively new feature in VCNB Mobile is something called CardValet. This feature allows you to easily safeguard your card information. CardValet allows you to deactivate your debit card when it’s not in use. Protect your debit card against fraud and theft by turning it on and off, limit international purchases and be selective about what merchants you allow or how much can be spent in a single purchase.

Want to try it out? Installing VCNB Mobile is a simple four step process! This mobile banking application requires a phone running an operating system that supports application downloads and may require a data services plan.

How To Install

  1. Visit your phone or tablet’s app store and download VCNB Mobile
  2. Enter your Access ID (online banking username)
  3. Answer your Online Banking security question (previously set)
  4. Enter your Online Banking password

There is no charge for VCNB Mobile or for Mobile Deposit. Learn more about VCNB Mobile and many of its features by watching a video here!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Presidential Portrait: Steve Hunter

In honor of our 150th anniversary in 2017 we are taking a look back at bank history and the people who have helped to shape our bank into the successful, secure institution that it is today. Read on to learn about one of our former presidents!

steve hunter

Steve Hunter

Steve Hunter became acquainted with Vinton County National Bank when he began serving as the bank’s Community Service Officer in 1975. At the time, asset size was about $18 million. By the time he retired in 2012 it was approximately $700 million. He was part of an era of growth and expansion that helped to shape the bank into what it is today.

A native of West Jefferson, Ohio, Steve holds a Bachelor’s Degree in Architecture and a Masters Degree in Regional Planning from Ohio University.

He served as Director of Research for the Ohio Valley Regional Development Commission prior to starting with the bank as Community Service Officer on September 1, 1975.

During his career with the bank, Steve served in a number of capacities that gave him a unique and broad understanding of how the company operates. He worked in lending, personnel, training and as the Marketing Director.

Steve was named Executive Vice President in 1984 and graduated from the ABA Stonier Graduate School of Banking in 1985. He was named to the Vinton County National Bank Board of Directors in 1987 before becoming Bank President on January 1, 1988. He served in that capacity until January 2000 when he became Chairman of the Vinton County National Bank Board.

He was CBI Vice Chairman when the Vinton County and Bremen Banks merged in 2009.

Steve has a vast knowledge of the bank’s history and can easily recite dates, stories, architectural tidbits and other information about the bank for a lot of its 150 year history. A walk through the McArthur office with Steve is like an architectural tour as he can easily recall stories from the bank’s history as they relate to the various expansion and remodeling projects.

He recalls a time in the early 1980’s when Bob Will Jr. told him to “go buy an Apple computer and make it do something.” He spearheaded the effort to bring personal computers into the bank, first using them to run monthly board reports and create spreadsheets while looking for other ways to incorporate the technology into the bank.

Steve went on to oversee numerous construction projects and to coordinate several acquisitions including those in Chillicothe, Laurelville, Logan and Richmond Dale.

One of his most significant contributions to the bank is the work he did to break into the Chillicothe market. This new, bigger market offered tremendous opportunity for growth that was close to the bank’s first home in McArthur. Today the offices in this market continue to thrive and market share is still growing.

Steve remains actively involved at the bank, serving as a Trustee for Community BancShares, Inc. His wife Trudy is retired from Vinton County Local Schools and they have one son, Marty, who is a Certified Public Accountant in New York City.

The couple reside in Chillicothe but enjoy traveling and spending winters in the South.

Learn more about VCNB Presidents! Click the links below to read about those we have profiled so far this year.

Daniel Will
Aaron Will
John L. Will
Robert B. Will, Sr.
J.G. Will
Robert B. Will Jr.
George Booth

How Costly Is Bad Credit? Many Don’t Know, Survey Shows

It’s 2017: Do you know what your credit score is?

Good credit is important for many reasons beyond qualifying for the best loan rates. And the very first step in building it is knowing your starting point. But a NerdWallet survey finds that while more than a quarter of Americans (26%) check their credit scores monthly or more often, nearly 1 in 8 (12%) have never checked their scores.

In an online survey of more than 2,000 U.S. adults, commissioned by NerdWallet and conducted by Harris Poll in April 2017, we asked Americans what they knew about the impact of bad credit, as well as factors that do and don’t affect credit scores. Here’s what we learned:

  • About half of Americans (49%) don’t know that having bad credit can limit a person’s options for cell phone service. There are ways to get a cell phone without a credit check, but consumers with poor credit have fewer options.
  • Almost a quarter of Americans (23%) think a person has just one credit score. Most consumers have many scores, and they can vary based on the information used to calculate them. The score provider and score model your lender will consult depends on the reason you’re looking for credit: there are auto-specific and mortgage-specific scores, for instance.
  • More than 2 in 5 Americans (41%) think carrying a small balance on a credit card month to month can help improve a person’s credit scores. This is a common misconception. To avoid interest charges, pay off credit cards each month.

CD-0402-CCD-ItAddsUpStudy_Infographic_Final

What you don’t know about credit can cost you

About 40 million Americans have a FICO credit score lower than 600 [1], and many might not understand the impact it can have on their everyday lives, even if they’re not applying for loans or saddled with high-interest debt.

The everyday effects of bad credit

Having bad credit is expensive, and not just because of the high interest rates lenders charge. More than 2 in 5 Americans (43%) don’t know that having bad credit can negatively impact the price of car insurance, and more than half (52%) don’t know that it can negatively impact the cost of utility deposits. These expenses are often cheaper or nonexistent for those with excellent credit, even though they don’t involve borrowing money.

Bad credit can even limit housing opportunities. Many landlords check applicants’ credit reports, but almost a quarter of Americans (23%) don’t know that having bad credit can negatively impact a person’s ability to rent an apartment. And almost half (49%) don’t know that bad credit can limit the ability to get a cell phone. Consumers with bad credit might be restricted to prepaid phones and miss out on carriers’ best plans. It might even be challenging to get certain jobs with poor credit.

Bad credit means fewer credit card choices

More than 1 in 5 Americans (21%) believe that a person with a credit score above 600 will qualify for any credit card he or she wants. Another 40% aren’t sure if a score above 600 qualifies a person for any credit card. In fact, 600 is a below average score and won’t give consumers access to most of the cards on the market.

Consumers with excellent credit have almost eight times as many credit card options as consumers with bad credit do. [2] Those with bad credit miss out on the cards with the best rewards and lowest interest rates, as well as the best purchase protections and travel benefits.

Misconceptions surround credit scores

Why do so many Americans have bad credit? Here’s one possibility: Increases in the cost of living have outpaced income growth for the past 13 years, according to NerdWallet’s annual household debt study. Many consumers might be maxing out credit cards to bridge the gap and then falling behind on payments or defaulting.

Another theory is that Americans simply don’t understand how credit works. Our survey found many misconceptions about credit scores, including the number of scores people have and the factors that go into them.

What’s a credit score?

A credit score is a three-digit number, usually on a scale of 300 to 850, that estimates how likely someone is to repay borrowed money. If you make regular payments to a lender — on a credit card or auto loan, for example — you probably have credit scores.

More than 1 in 10 Americans (11%) think everyone starts out with a perfect credit score. Actually, you must build your scores from scratch — but they don’t start from zero. Want to measure your progress? Your scores won’t necessarily be listed on your credit report, although almost two-thirds of Americans (64%) think they are. The free credit reports available once per year from AnnualCreditReport.com don’t include scores. However, you can get free scores from various sources, including NerdWallet.

The components of a credit score

Five basic factors go into most credit scores: payment history, credit utilization, length of credit history, types of credit in use and new credit.

Payment history: One of the best things you can do for your credit scores is to make payments on time, 100% of the time. You’re best off paying your entire credit card balance, but at least pay the minimum by the due date. Creditors won’t report payments that are only a few days late to credit bureaus, but pay 30 days or more late and you can tank your scores.

Credit utilization: This refers to the proportion of your available credit you’re using at any given time. Between 1% and 30% is ideal, but people misunderstand these numbers.

Possibly because using credit helps your scores more than not using it at all, more than 2 in 5 Americans (41%) think carrying a small balance from month to month can help improve a person’s scores, while one-fifth (20%) think it can hurt it. In fact, whether someone carries a small balance probably doesn’t affect his or her scores at all.

“The idea that you have to carry debt to have good credit is a dangerous, expensive myth that needs to die,” says NerdWallet columnist Liz Weston, author of the book “Your Credit Score.” Carrying a balance will mean you pay interest, but it probably won’t have any impact on your credit — just your wallet.

Length of credit history: This includes the total time you’ve had credit — starting from your first credit card or loan — and the average age of all your credit accounts. It’s a good idea to keep your oldest account open and avoid closing other older, unused accounts unless you have a good reason, like they charge annual fees or you need to shed a joint account. If you do choose to close other accounts, keep length of credit history in mind to limit the negative effect on your scores.

Mix of credit accounts: Having a mix of account types doesn’t have a large impact on credit scores, but it might be helpful to have both revolving accounts, such as credit cards and lines of credit, and installment loans, such as mortgages, auto loans or student loans. You can build and maintain good credit with just one type of account.

New credit: The final factor concerns the number of new accounts you’ve opened or applied to open. When you apply for a credit card or loan, a “hard” inquiry appears on your credit file. Checking your own scores results in a “soft” inquiry that won’t hurt your credit. But hard inquiries aren’t great for your scores, so you’ll want to limit the number of applications you submit.

The exception is when you’re “rate shopping” for a mortgage or auto loan. In these cases, it’s smart to apply at several different lenders to get the best rate. The credit bureaus count multiple inquiries as a single inquiry as long as they’re made within a certain time frame, usually a few weeks.

How to improve bad credit

Improving your credit means working on the five factors above. However, you also might be able to improve your credit by catching mistakes on your credit reports. Most consumers have one at each of the main credit bureaus: Experian, TransUnion and Equifax. You can obtain each of these reports for free once per year.

Once you receive your reports, read each one closely and dispute any errors. Incorrect information could hurt your credit, denying you access to low loan rates, superior credit products and other benefits of good credit.

People trying to build credit commonly run into a catch-22: They need a loan or credit card to increase their scores, but they can’t get approved for a loan or credit card because their scores are low or nonexistent. For example, it’s hard to find good credit cards for bad credit.

Those with poor credit have a few options:

Credit-builder loansThese loans typically have low interest rates, regardless of your credit scores. But there’s a catch: You don’t receive the money from the loan until you pay it off. These loans exist solely for the purpose of building credit. The lender puts the money into a savings account, and you can claim it once you’ve paid the balance in full. The bank will report your payments to the credit bureaus, which should help your scores, provided you’ve made all the payments on time.

Secured credit cardsWith a secured card, you put down a security deposit that’s usually equal to the card’s credit limit, but sometimes is less. This reduces the issuer’s risk. Not everyone who applies for a secured card gets approved, but they’re still a good option for those with bad credit.

Secured cards aren’t prepaid, so it’s critical that you pay off your charges each month. After “graduating” to an unsecured card or closing the account in good standing, you’ll get your deposit back.

Secured personal loans: If you want to build credit but also need a loan, a secured personal loan might be the way to go. These allow you to borrow against a car, savings account or other assets, including such things as a recreational vehicle or furniture. The rate will likely be higher than it would be on a credit-builder loan, but you’ll have access to the loan money.

“You don’t need to carry credit card debt to have great credit scores,” Weston says. “But you do need to have credit accounts and use them responsibly.”

Methodology

This survey was conducted online within the U.S. by Harris Poll on behalf of NerdWallet from April 6-10, 2017, among 2,250 adults ages 18 and older. This online survey is not based on a probability sample, and therefore no estimate of theoretical sampling error can be calculated. For complete survey methodology, including weighting variables, please contact cc-studies@nerdwallet.com.

Footnotes

[1] According to Ethan Dornhelm, principal scientist at FICO, there are about 40 million U.S. consumers with credit scores below 600. There are an additional 53 million Americans who can’t be scored because they have too little information on their credit file or no credit file at all.

[2] According to the NerdWallet database of more than 1,200 cards, there are 7.7 times as many cards available to those with excellent credit compared to those with poor/bad credit.

A Presidential Portrait: Remembering George Booth

In honor of our 150th anniversary in 2017 we are taking a look back at bank history and the people who have helped to shape our bank into the successful, secure institution that it is today. Read on to learn about one of our former presidents!

George Booth

George E. Booth

 

George E. Booth holds the distinction of being the first bank President who was not a member of the Will family, an accomplishment that was both an honor and a symbol of his abilities as a banker.

George had a lengthy career with the bank, working in a number of roles, both with the customer and behind the scenes in the operations area of the bank. This experience gave him a good grasp of how to balance the profitability of the bank with providing customers with a top notch experience.

He was born May 18, 1918 on the Yankee Street family farm south of Wilkesville that belonged to his parents David R. and Minnie Wilcox Booth. George earned a Bachelor’s Degree from Rio Grande College at the age of 24 and taught elementary school for four years before enlisting in the Army Air Corps during World War II. He attained a rank of Warrant Officer in Normandy, France.

George began his banking career in 1952 and had served as Vice President, Cashier and Director before being appointed President in 1984. He held that position through 1988 and continued as Vice Chairman of the Board of Directors until his retirement in 1996. He also served as Secretary/Treasurer of Community BancShares, Inc.

Upon retiring in 1996, George joked that he was retiring by degrees as he had begun retiring almost ten years before.

The years of George’s term as President were exciting at the bank as these years saw Community Bancshares purchase First Bremen Bank and growth into Fairfield County.While the Bremen Bank continued to operate independently of Vinton County National Bank, there was much opportunity for cooperation and for Vinton County to assist Bremen as it grew. He worked closely with his longtime friend and colleague Bob Will to guide the bank through this period.

When George stepped down from the office of President, Bank Chairman and CEO Bob Jr. complimented George’s accomplishments, noting that George had been an important member of the bank’s staff since 1952. George was an important part of the bank’s growth from three million in assets in 1952 to 66 million in 1988.

During his lifetime George not only worked for the bank, he and his wife Dorothy Booth started the Booth Real Estate and Insurance Agency, Inc. He was also a member of the Orphan’s Friend Masonic Lodge in Wilkesville. George enjoyed the outdoors, hunting, and loved spending time with his family. He also was known to embrace technology and was well known for his presence on the social media site Facebook for several years prior to his death.

George and his beloved wife Dorothy were married for seventy years and had five children: David Booth, Janet Bolender, Janice Smith, Mary Ann Simmons and Ellen Lash. Their large family now includes grandchildren and great grandchildren.

George died at his McArthur residence on April 27, 2014. He was 95.

Read other posts about bank history and 150th celebrations here.

 

A Quick Look: Simplify Your Banking

Most of us lead busy lives. In the spirit of Simplify Your Life Week, we wanted to do a quick summary of some ways you can simplify your banking and {hopefully} free up time for things that are important to you.

Online and Mobile
Gone are the days you have to wait for the mailman to bring your monthly statement. You can still do this but you can also just log in to your online account and see your current balance, past statements, current statement and even pay bills, open an account or prequalify for a loan. It’s free and easy to use our website, plus it gives you greater control over your own money. With VCNB Mobile, you’ll find a one stop shop for your quick banking needs. This is free app gives you access to your deposits and loans from your mobile device. Here you can also pay bills, transfer funds and even deposit a check. It’s like carrying around the bank on your phone.

Want to know more? Here are some specifics!

Online Bill Pay
Many customers seem to think Online Bill Pay is the greatest thing since sliced bread and we are inclined to agree. Set up recurring bills to automatically pay at your convenience or log in and pay a single bill. Either way, it saves using checks and stamps. It also guarantees your payment will be taken from your account when you say. It’s free as long as you use it at least once a month. The great thing about Bill Pay is that it requires so little effort and time to keep paying bills within your complete control.

Popmoney® personal payment service
While Bill Pay helps you pay bills, Popmoney allows you to send funds electronically to individuals. All you need is the person’s email address or mobile phone number. They will receive a text or email notification that your money is waiting for them. They can deposit the money into the checking or savings account of their choice.

Mobile Deposit
Have a check but no time to hit the bank? Deposit it using VCNB Mobile and the camera on your mobile device. You can deposit funds in to the VCNB checking or savings account of your choice for free!

Account Alerts
You don’t even have to log in to keep up with activity related to your checking account, savings account, certificate of deposit or loan. There are nineteen notifications to choose from, allowing you to receive an email or text for activity that interests you. Want to know when your debit card is used or when your checking balance dips below a certain amount? Request reminders for when your loan payment is due or late and even get an alert when your CD is about to mature. Sign up for this free service online.

A Few More Things
Our website and mobile app provide a host of other ways to simplify your banking and save you money. For example, if you’re in the market for a new home, use our online pre-qualification to learn how much you can afford. Open accounts online, track the UChoose Rewards® you earn with Rewards Checking, request a credit increase for your credit card and even chat online with someone in customer service!

Life is too short to waste time on banking. Streamline your banking and your money management with these and other great products at VCNB!

VCNB Business Banking: On Your Corner and In Your Corner

If you own or manage a business you could probably write a book about everyday headaches like tax laws, payroll and managing people.

However, we don’t want your banking experience to be a chapter in that book. In fact, we want to make your life easier and banking more pleasant. That’s why we are constantly looking for better ways to serve our businesses customers. Just this year we restructured our business accounts so that we can do just that.

As your community bank, we want to help your business grow and prosper. We want banking to be one of the easiest things you deal with in your fast-paced day.

In fact, we don’t want you to think of us just as bankers who handle paperwork and wait on customers. We want to be your ally.

We want to help you build your business and we want to see you succeed. As a leader in advanced technology and new services, we help large and small businesses every day. As a community bank, we offer personal service that will make you feel comfortable and appreciated.

At VCNB, you can have a conversation with a real person who can address your real problems and help you set up services that will make your real life a little easier. We know you’re busy. We know you’re up early and hard at work before a lot of folks have their first cup of joe. We know your schedule isn’t always flexible. That’s why we keep skilled people on hand to assist with your business banking needs, people who will respect your time and deliver the solutions you need.

Speaking of solutions – did you know that you can deposit checks from the comfort of your office? No need to leave work for a bank drop when you can do it while minding the shop. Did you know that we offer a payroll service or that we now have a Rewards Checking account for businesses? We even have a fraud detection tool that protects against altered checks and counterfeit check fraud. The list of perks that come with our new Business Rewards Checking and Business Rewards Checking Plus is too long to cover here!

We like to say that we’re “On Your Corner and In Your Corner.” This isn’t just an advertising line. With sixteen convenient locations, there’s a VCNB banking center somewhere close to you. Stop by the bank in your neighborhood or give us a call to get started. Learn more about business banking opportunities by visiting our website.