Barb Clemons Will Retire January 31

Barb ClemmonsThe tellers who work with Barb Clemons like to tell newcomers not to be offended when customers don’t want their help. That’s because Barb has a following of customers who would simply rather wait for Barb. She’s been working at our McArthur office for almost 33 years and her customers have come to know her and trust the work she does.

She knows them well too. “You get to know them and how they want their work done. They like to just hand you their stuff and know that it will be correctly done. You learn who you can joke around with and they will tell you about their life and things that are important to them,” she said. “I’m glad people want to come to my window. It makes you feel appreciated.”

Barb has a good sense of humor and an easy laugh but she takes her work seriously, always focused on the task at hand and on pleasing the customer. “People don’t realize how much is involved in teller work. There’s a lot to do and remember and it can get stressful. A lot of people think we just stand there and count money but it’s a really complicated job,” she said.

She’s so good at what she does that she trains most of the new tellers in McArthur. In fact, countless tellers have benefited from Barb’s years of experience. “I have trained a lot of tellers. Lots and lots of tellers. You know I trained Mark Erslan when he came here,” she said.

Now the bank president, Mark started with VCNB as a management trainee, a program that required he learn several jobs including teller. She laughs as she recounts the day that his drawer was off a single dime. “He likes to tease me about that day.  He went home that night and found that dime in the cuff of his dress pants,” she said.  “He came in the next day with that dime and we teased him about it. Sure, Mark, it was there all the time!”

When asked about the advice she gives new tellers she thought for a moment before saying “you know there’s really so much that you need to know but the first thing you need to do is pay close attention to what the customer is saying. You need to hear what they want and if you’re not sure, it’s a good idea to repeat things so they can confirm it,” she explained. “The customer in front of you should be the most important person. Make them feel special and important. Make them feel comfortable.”

Before coming to work for the bank, Barb worked at a local nursing home for close to ten years. Some former classmates who worked for the bank thought she would be a good fit for an open teller position in Wilkesville and they asked her to apply for the position. But after a month of training in McArthur then President Bob Will was so impressed with her that he asked her to stay on in McArthur where she would have more opportunity for advancement.

Barb tried working in new accounts but quickly realized that she really enjoyed being a teller and that the new accounts position was not for her. “I would like to think that I’m good at what I do and I like that every day is different. Yes, I do the same things all day but the customers are different every day and that keeps things interesting.”

After close to 43 years in the workforce, Barb is excited to have some free time. “I can’t even imagine what it will be like to get up when I want and not have to come someplace but I’m looking forward to it. I just want to sit on the porch swing and do what I want to do,” she exclaimed.  “I’m looking forward to having time to get out and do things, to go to lunch with my friends, to keep up with stuff around the house.”

She and husband Mark were high school sweethearts and have been married for 45 years. They have two grown children and four grandkids. “I’m looking forward to spending more time with them and having time to go to the kids’ ballgames and things. But I will miss my customers and my coworkers. Some of my customers have expressed that they’re sad to see me go but that they’re happy for me. I want them to know I’ll miss them too.”

Barb will officially retire on January 31 alongside longtime coworkers Jane Nickels and  Brenda Brooks. Customers can stop by the bank on January 29 to wish the ladies well during an informal reception. A reception will also be held at our Richmond Dale office that day to honor Elaine Prater who also will retire on January 31.

 

Beth Bayless To Retire January 15

Beth BaylessCanal Banking Center customers know Beth Bayless as the quick witted banker who is always ready with a kind word and smile. Her coworkers see Beth as a smart cookie who knows her business. All of them will be sad to see her go when she retires on January 15.

Beth joined the VCNB family in 2002 just before the completion of the bank’s new Canal Winchester location. She likes to joke that she came with the building as she remembers tracking the construction progress for months leading up to their opening. “They practically built it around me,” she quipped.

The Canal Winchester native has a total of 35 years in banking after a short stint in education. She went to college in Arizona where she taught Physical Education for three years. She later transitioned in to banking and built a name for herself at two banks in Phoenix.

When she was moving back to Canal Winchester in 2002, her mother told her about a billboard she saw on Route 33. It advertised the new Canal Banking Center and her mom thought it sounded like a good opportunity. “Mom saw the billboard on 33 and picked up an application at E. Main. The rest is history, I guess you would say.”

Beth’s philosophies toward her customers have served her and her customers well over the years. “Ask yourself – how do you want to feel when you go in someplace you’re not familiar? How do you want to feel when you have a question that you’re not sure about or a problem you don’t understand? It’s important to put people at ease and laughter is sometimes the way to do that,” she explained. “You have to be available to listen and to help.”

She also spoke of the benefits of working for a community bank as opposed to a big one. “We still have the opportunity to know everyone in the bank, to know who to call for an answer or to take care of a problem quickly at a critical time in a customer’s life.  How cool is it that we can affect a customer’s life in that way? Every one of us has that power within this organization and I really do love that,” she said.

She says she will miss the people but is looking forward to the free time and relaxation that will come with retirement. She has a trip planned and has her eye on some non-profits she would like to help. “Other than that, I’m just going to wait and see what happens,” she said. “It’s been incredible. Working here has been the best over-the-top fun and a good ride but I’m happy for the opportunity to do something else.”

Beth’s last day will be on January 15. Stop by the bank to wish her the best in her retirement!

 

Out With A Bang: Sheila Stickel Will Retire On New Year’s Eve

Sheila S.JPGWhen Sheila Stickel started with Vinton County National Bank in 1999, the bank had just three locations in McArthur, Wilkesville and Chillicothe. Much bank work was still done manually and online banking hadn’t even been invented.

Since then, the bank has expanded immensely and Sheila has worked in several branches and jobs, helping countless customers in many ways. But no matter her role here, Sheila always has the needs of the customer at heart.

That’s why her customers will be sad to learn that Sheila’s career with the bank will end when she retires on December 31.

A Vinton County native, Sheila worked for Society Bank in Columbus in the seventies and eighties before she went to an ophthalmic distributor where she sold equipment to eye doctors. When her sister, longtime VCNB lender Brenda Fee, called and suggested she apply for the Head Teller position in Chillicothe, Sheila thought it was worth a shot.

Today she is part of the VCNB Products and Services group, a team of five that tests, implements and maintains new products and services. They also assist both personal and business customers as well as bank employees who need help with those products and services.  She is well known to Business Online Banking customers as their go-to person for all answers about that class of products that she just calls “BOB.”

When she’s not helping customers, she’s busy generating several daily reports as well as monthly reports for lenders, New Accounts Offers and Personal Bankers.

Before going to Products and Services in 2012, Sheila worked directly with customers as Teller, Head Teller, New Accounts Officer and Branch Manager in a few different locations including West Fair Lancaster, Canal Winchester, Main Street Chillicothe, Laurelville and Tarlton. Since joining Products and Services, she has also worked in Ashville and Circleville, bringing the total number of branches she has worked in to seven.  She has visited all of the branches except the newest in Jackson. “I’m proud to say that I got to work in so many branches and see so many grow,” she said.

“I’ve seen the construction of some branches and the merging of some. We’ve gone from teller machines to online banking. Probably the most impressed I’ve been was going from the old teller machines to computers,” she smiled, explaining that teller machines were basically just large adding machines.

During the years before computers, everything was done manually. From manually stuffing statement envelopes to bundling up work for the Proof Department to process in another office, everything took longer and was more challenging than we find in the tech friendly bank of today. When the bank introduced online banking they held a contest for naming the product. Her entry “Bank to the Future” didn’t become the name of online banking but was used as the slogan. “I won a day off for the idea and Marketing went to town and used that to promote our Online Banking!”

Much has changed since Sheila won that contest as customers can now do almost all their business and personal banking online. “Today businesses can do almost everything they need with the click of a mouse. It just fascinates me how much control they have over their accounts and activities,” she said.

While she says she will miss the people, Sheila has a lot to look forward to including spending time with her recently retired husband and two grown children. She is especially excited to spend time with her seven year-old grandchild and a new grandbaby expected in June.

She looks forward to traveling some and to simply doing what she wants to do on her own time. “I have enjoyed my job but it’s time to hang up my hat,” she smiled. “Happy trails to me!”

The bank will celebrate Sheila’s retirement with a party on New Year’s Eve. Stop by the Pickaway County Banking Center in Circleville that day to wish Sheila good luck in this exciting new stage of her life!

 

 

 

Small Business Spotlight: Homegrown on Main

Small businesses are important to communities and running a business is tough work. That’s why we feature a small business in one of our communities every month!

Step inside Homegrown on Main and it feels a little like coming home. First you notice the aroma of candles and homemade soaps. Then you spot the wood floors and character of a remodeled old building before your eyes focus on an array of finely crafted local items.

Once your eyes settle on the shelves of pottery, baskets of photos and artful displays of jewelry and wood items, it’s hard to look away.

This store on Logan’s Main Street is home to 53 artists and craftspeople who create unique works of art from their homes and studios around the Hocking Hills region. Store Manager Rose Arthur smiles as she discusses the merchandise they sell that cannot be found anywhere else. “I love that we have such a variety of high quality work,” she said. “These are things you cannot buy anywhere else.”

The variety of mediums represented here is impressive – woodworking, fused glass, painting, blown glass, drawing, photography, candle making, writing, leather work, jewelry, pottery, knitting, sewing, crochet, alcohol inks and paper goods can be found here, representing a range of tastes and prices.

They also sell items to help local organizations including Empty Bowls, the Washboard Festival, Hemlock Heroes, the Hocking County Historical and Genealogical Society and Logan in Bloom.

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“It’s a lot to look at and take in. I think you see something different every time you walk through, Rose said. “We have some regulars who come in just to see what’s new so the artists are often changing their inventory and trying new things.”

For example, painter Donna Voelkel was inspired by peers creating alcohol inks. With some research and practice, she has mastered innovative techniques for embellishing alcohol inks, creating something entirely fresh and new. At the age of 84, she is proving that it’s always a good time to do something innovative.

This storefront was actually born from the ashes of the region’s beloved Hocking Hills State Park Dining Lodge which was destroyed by fire in 2016. Members of the Hocking Hills Artists and Craftsmen Association sold their creations at the lodge.

In addition to losing their art to the fire, they lost retail space as well.

That’s when the group began devising a new plan with the help of the Hocking Hills Tourism Association, the local organization aimed at bringing tourism to the community. Efforts were already underway to revitalize downtown Logan and it made sense for the partnership to be part of the revival by opening a retail store here.

The rest, as they say, is history. Today the partnership has strengthened and the interest in locally made art and crafts is ever growing. They’ve grown so much, in fact, that they outgrew the original location and have moved to a spacious storefront just down the street.

76993332_1485807894920285_3474159901402464256_nThe store is a popular stop for visitors who are looking to take home a vacation memory. “When people travel they like to take home a piece of the experience. For some that’s a painting or woodworking. Many people are collecting Christmas ornaments from their travels and we have those too,” she said.

But Homegrown on Main has a large appeal among locals too. She said that some customers come in  just to see what the store is about only to find that it’s a great source for gifts, handmade greeting cards or even something special for themselves.  “Locals are really starting to catch on and we’re so glad to have people in our community come in too,” she said.

Rose pointed out that most of the art represented at Homegrown on Main comes from people who have full time careers or other barriers that prevent them from being a full time artist with a storefront of their own. Having everyone work together in this partnership has improved visibility for the local artists, writers and musicians represented here.  They also act as a visitor’s center, answering questions, giving directions and distributing local information and maps.

One unique quality of this store is that shoppers can sometimes meet the artists during demonstrations. “People love to meet the artists at work and maybe even buy something from an artist they met who showed them how they do their work,” she said.  Some of the artists even offer workshops in their respected areas including basket weaving, glass, painting, knitting, water colors and jewelry.

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Rose hopes to see lots of new and familiar faces at the Holiday Open House they are planning for December 7. It will be held from noon to 6 p.m. and will include snacks, a door prize drawing, demonstrations and music by The Grace Notes from 3:30 to 5 p.m. The Logan Christmas Parade will also be held at 2 p.m. that day, making it the perfect time to stop by for a visit and some locally made gifts!

While there, be sure to check out their new holiday window display designed by Marcia Meyers. The Logan resident is known for her lifelike sculptures and Rose is certain that Santa will be a part of the festive window planned for reveal the day after Thanksgiving. If you’re out shopping on Black Friday or Small Business Saturday, be sure to stop in to see the window and find that perfect gift you won’t see in any big box store!

Homegrown on Main welcomes shoppers at their new location at 65 West Main Street in Logan.  They are open Monday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Follow them on Facebook for news and information including events like the Holiday Open House on December 7.

What We’re Grateful For: VCNB Employees Give Thanks

Thanksgiving Greeting Card

Every day is a good opportunity to give thanks but we’re especially mindful of how fortunate we are during November and this season of thanks. As a community bank, we know we are lucky to do business in such wonderful towns and communities across southern and central Ohio.

We are thankful for customers, many of whom have been with us for years if not decades. Some hail from families that have done business with VCNB since the 1860s. We are also incredibly thankful for our employees. Some of these folks have spent their entire careers with VCNB and are eyeing retirement while we have many newcomers who are eager to learn the VCNB way.

We asked our employees to tell us what they’re thankful for this year and here are some of the responses we received. We hope you enjoy reading them as much as we did!

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I’m thankful for the friends I’ve made here at VCNB! I came in and was instantly made welcome by almost everyone! I’ve built a lot of wonderful friendships here and for that, I am forever thankful!

Johnathon Bentley
Personal Banker in McArthur

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I am thankful first and foremost for my family! I am also very thankful for all the military men and women that are or have served to keep us safe!! Finally I’m grateful to be living in Perry County around some wonderful neighbors that look out for each other!

Alyssa Holbrook
Personal Banker in Bremen

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I am thankful for the past seventeen years of employment with VCNB and the privilege of working with a great group of people.

Beth Bayless
Senior Personal Banker in Canal Winchester

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I am thankful for my wonderful family, my great friends and my health and job.

Alice McCloud
Teller in Wilkesville

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I’m thankful my wife and I were each able to transition to working in Columbus this past year. This has allowed us to move back to where we grew up and be close to family. It’s been so great to be back around both of our families, especially our niece and nephews.

Josh Palmer
Branch Manager in Pataskala

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I am most thankful for my boys who push me every day to be a better person and remind me what is most important in life. I’m thankful for the success and growth we continue to have at VCNB and the great people I get to work with across all lines of the bank. I am also really thankful for the holiday season that, despite all the to-do’s and crowds, gives us time to spend with loved ones, reflect on the past year, and look forward to the next.

Justin Pike
Chief Auditor

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Most of all, I am thankful for my four boys – they are the loves of my life. I am also thankful to have an amazing fiancé, beautiful home and a job I love.

Melissa Wietelmann
Assistant Branch Manager in Ashville

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Give thanks not just on Thanksgiving Day, but every day of your life. Appreciate and never take for granted all that you have.

Erin Hart
Teller in Laurelville

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I’m so thankful for the family and friends in my life. They all mean so much to me. So happy to still have Mom here and doing well and that she and I can still travel to see family in Tennessee and Florida.

Paula Goodfellow
Senior Retail Accounts Officer in Chillicothe

 

Technology You Need, Service You Expect

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What does it mean when we say that VCNB has the technology you need and the service you expect?

It means that we understand customers today often prefer and even need technology when doing their banking and that we are eager make available as many of those tools as possible. On the other hand, we know there is no substitute for the human touch and that our employees are still here to help whenever you need them.

For example, many of our customers enjoy self-service aspects that come with the mobile app and website. With VCNB Mobile, you can check balances, transfer funds, pay bills, send money to a friend, open an account and even deposit a check using the camera on your mobile device!

You can even apply for a mortgage on our website! Use our Mortgage Lending Center to find a lender near you, apply for a loan or try out one of our financial calculators.

VCNB customers are also enjoying the way that technology gives them access to a large ATM network. Use the MoneyPass app or website to locate one of 32,000 nationwide surcharge-free ATMs available near you.

There are even self-serve stations in our newly constructed and remodeled offices to make it easier for customers to access information and to self-serve rather than meet with a banker.

But what happens if you have a question about that checking account you opened online or if you’re not sure how to answer a question on the mortgage application? Maybe your teenager wants to open their Student Checking account online but has questions about how a checking account works.

We have a small army of people at the ready to help. You will find Customer Service Representatives available by phone and online chat. We also have personal bankers, tellers and mortgage lenders in our branches who will be happy to answer questions, give advice and help with whatever you need.

Here at VCNB we love to see customers come into our banks but we know this isn’t always convenient for our customer. That’s why we try to be here when you need us – both in person and through technology!

In fact, it may be unfair to say that we offer the technology you need and the service you expect.  After all, we want you to need and expect both of these things from VCNB!

 

 

 

 

Vicki McCathren Retires From VCNB

When Vicki McCathren started her career at Vinton County National Bank, the banking industry was just ramping up its use of computers in branches. Online banking was still in its infancy and the concept of a phone app where customers could take charge of their money was still a few years down the road.

On Friday, she will retire after almost 21 years with the bank and a wealth of knowledge about tasks that customers likely never think about but that are important behind the scenes work.

Vicki McCathren 2019 Retirement“It’s incredible the changes I’ve seen over the years,” Vicki said. “The changes in how we do things, in the technology is pretty amazing. Banking is so much easier for the customer too.”

Vicki started in the VCNB Customer Service Department, eventually working her way up to be department supervisor. At that time, Customer Service encompassed not just traditional customer service responsibilities but other work including inputting account information, balancing savings bonds, managing debit card disputes and a host of other things. “We all shared the work. Everyone knew how to do everything and we rotated responsibilities. It was a great group to work with,” she said before describing how she went on to take a position in the bank’s Operations Department in 2007.

As Senior Operations Processor, Vicki has several daily responsibilities, most notably in the area of debit card disputes. “I’ve done debit card disputes for nearly 21 years,” she laughed. “No matter where I went in this bank, they went with me!”

That may be because Vicki has a flair for problem solving, the patience and attention to detail needed to work through a complicated situation and a customer service mindset that helps her appreciate how important this work is to the customer.

But she calls herself a “Jack of All Trades” and emphasizes how well her department works together. “There are things that I do every day and things that I know how to do so I can help if someone needs help or if they’re on vacation. We keep really busy but we work well together. It’s been a great group of ladies and gents to work with,” she explained.

Vicki said that her department is experienced at problem solving – both from having years of experience to draw from and because of their research skills – and that they often serve as a resource for bank employees who need assistance for the customers. “Everything we do is for the customer. Without our customer we wouldn’t have a bank so it’s important to take care of them,” she said.

She is looking forward to retirement, hopeful that she will have the time to simply enjoy life and to spend more time with loved ones. She’s especially looking forward to having more time with her husband and eleven grandkids and may take on a volunteer gig at her grandson’s school. “I have no big plans for sleeping in or anything like that. I just want to see what I can get into!”

She smiles at the thought of lunches with her sisters and beams at the idea she will soon have time to cook big meals for her family – about 75 people including her siblings and their children and grandchildren. “I like cooking and feeding my family but it’s hard to do when you’re working,” she smiled.

“I remember when I was a kid and how simple things were. Time was slower. Life was easier. Sunday was a day to rest and to have a big dinner as a family. You’d sit on the porch and watch it get dark so you could catch lightening bugs. I’m hoping to recapture some of that,” she said while talking about bringing loved ones together.

Never one to be the center of attention, Vicki has asked that her last day of work be low key. In lieu of a party, she requested cake and a quiet celebration with her coworkers in the Operations Department. She will retire Friday, just two days shy of her 21st anniversary with the bank.

Congratulations Vicki! We will miss you!

 

 

 

New ATMs Are Coming To Most VCNB Branches

Exciting changes are coming to the ATMs at most of our bank branches! These modern ATMs essentially are a 24-hour branch for basic services that you can access from your car.

The new machines have larger, easy to read touch screens and a couple of features that our customers are already loving.

With intelligent deposit, customers are able to deposit both checks and cash without an envelope. Because of this, immediate access is granted to all the cash you deposit. Better yet, up to $500 of a check can be immediately accessed.

That means when depositing a check, you can immediately withdrawal up to $500 of that amount!

VCNB Vice President of Operations Bryan Radabaugh said that the new machines have been well received so far. “People seem to be loving it. They’re easy to use, easy to read and they give you access to your funds much more quickly than the old machines,” he said.

Making a deposit with these machines is easy. Simply insert your debit card, hit deposit and follow the prompts on the screen. Because deposits are not in an envelope, the machine reads each check and each bill individually, allowing the machine to calculate the deposit amount and allowing the customer to know their money is all accounted for in the deposit. If the customer disagrees with the machine’s calculations, there is an option to request the funds be returned to the customer rather than proceeding with the deposit.

The customer’s receipt for the completed transaction indicates the number and type of bills deposited, along with images of the checks they deposited.

This is a far cry from the old style machines which require customers to place their money in envelopes. Because the machine cannot tell whether the envelope is empty or full or whether the amount the customer types in is the correct amount, customers using the old machines have to wait to access their funds on the next business day.

Radabaugh said that his reports show ATM deposit usage has seen impressive increases in the branches with new ATMs. “We’re seeing a lot more people deposit in the evenings after the bank closes and even in the morning before hours. Sundays are also busy because many people are simply unable to bank during conventional hours,” he said.  “We don’t want anyone feeling like they’re not welcome in a branch but this is another channel for someone who struggles to make it into the lobby.”

The project, which started last fall, will be completed in early 2020. Branches with completed ATMs are Pataskala, Logan, McArthur, West Fair Avenue in Lancaster, Bremen, Laurelville, Commercial Point, Circleville and Grove City. A new ATM will be installed in Ashville in time for the opening of that new branch this summer. Customers at any of the above branches can request a demonstration from branch staff. Our employees will be happy to help you!

 

VCNB Customers Can Access Over 32,000 Surcharge Free ATMs

VCNB rolled out something earlier this year that’s been a game changer for many of our customers. It’s called MoneyPass®. Have you heard of it?

No?

Well, keep reading because we think you’ll like what we have to say.

MP_2CF(lg) [Converted]Moneypass is a network that allows VCNB customers to use more than 32,000 ATMs nationwide surcharge free! It’s easy for you to use and will provide you with access to an ATM nearly anywhere you go in the United States.

This means you can still access your VCNB accounts via an ATM without paying a surcharge when you’re on vacation, away at college, traveling for work or visiting family coast-to-coast.

Here’s how it works!

  1. Visit their website or download the MoneyPass app.
  2. Search the zip code where you need an ATM.
  3. Choose the ATM you wish to visit!

MoneyPass will even give you driving directions to your destination. It’s as easy as 1-2-3! Visit the MoneyPass website to get started or visit the App Store on your mobile device to download the MoneyPass app today!