Four Ways To Spring Clean Your Finances

Spring is a great time to clean up your finances! Here are four easy ways to get started!

  1. Review your credit report –It is important to make sure your credit report is accurate and free of mistakes. By law, you are entitled to order one free credit report each year from each of the three major credit bureaus. Access yours here. 
  2. Review your budget and plan to pay off credit card debt – Is your budget current? Do you even have a budget? Every person with an income and expenses needs a budget to help them know what is happening with their money. While reviewing your budget, also look at your debts. Do you still have leftover holiday debt hanging around? It’s time to knock that out.
  3. Start an emergency fund – Most Americans have less than $1,000 saved. If faced with a crisis, how would you pay for it? Putting away just a few dollars every payday can be a big help in an emergency. Click here to open a Passbook Savings at VCNB with as little as $100.
  4. Organize and shred old financial documents – Sort through your old files and only keep what you absolutely need. Remember, the IRS has up to six years to audit you so be sure to keep tax records and supporting documents for that long. Learn more here.

A couple more thoughts – take a look at your bank accounts, credit cards and even the way you pay your bills. Are you paying too much credit card interest? Are you pleased with your checking account? Talk to a VCNB account representative about how you can be rewarded for your credit card purchases with a Platinum Visa© Card and for your everyday banking habits with a Rewards Checking Account at VCNB. Also ask about how Online Bill Pay can save you time and money and even prevent late fees!

Finally, we just confirmed some shred days for two of our offices:

May 5, 2018 from 10 a.m. to Noon
Canal Banking Center
 
June 9, 2018 from 10 a.m. to Noon
Friendly Bremen Banking Center (W. Fair Avenue location)

This is a great, free way to safely dispose of important documents that you do not need to keep. We’ll post more information as it becomes available!
 
Learn more about our Rewards Checking Account, Platinum Visa, Online Bill Pay and other VCNB products here!

Now Is The Time For Home Improvements!

JCBC Billboard - HELOC Now is the Time - (Jackson Digital)

How long is your home improvement wish list? Is there something special you would like to do that would make your home perfect? Is it the bathroom of your dreams or a bigger kitchen to accommodate your growing family? Maybe you want a more spacious family room or a pool so your home can be the hangout for all the neighborhood teens?

Whatever it is you would like to accomplish, here at VCNB we believe that now is the time to make those dreams a reality. Now through June 30, open a new home equity line of credit to receive an introductory annual percentage rate (APR) of 3.99 percent for the first twelve months.

If you have equity in your home, why not use it to make your house the home you’ve always wanted it to be? See below for the terms of this promotion and click here to get started! 

This promotion is available April 1, 2018 through June 30, 2018. The introductory Annual Percentage Rate (APR) will be fixed at 3.99% for the first (12) months from the note date and will be terminated at the end of the twelve (12) month period. After the introductory period, the loan will become a variable rate loan. The subsequent APR may vary from Prime Rate (index) to Prime Rate plus 0.25% (margin is dependent on loan-to-value ratio). Prime rate is based on the current rate published in the Wall Street Journal. As of March 22, 2018 that rate was 4.75%. The current APR using the prime rate plus the 0.25% margin is 5.00%. The APR will never exceed 18.00%. This promotion applies only to new lines of credit. Promotion available for single family, owner-occupied, primary residence only; excludes manufactured properties. Minimum line amount of $10,000 is required. Maximum loan-to-value ratio is 89.00%. After the initial 12 month period there is a $50.00 annual fee. Title Insurance and Survey Fees will be assessed to borrower for loans of $100,000 or greater. Fees range between $350.00 and $1500.00. Property and flood insurance will be required, if applicable. Applicants must successfully meet our Home Equity Line of Credit underwriting standards. Not all applicants will qualify for this promotional offer. Alternative rates and terms are available. NMLS #483350

 

Now Is The Time To Buy!

FBBC Billboard - Home Loan Now is the Time Alt (Nauman Digital)

Buying a home isn’t a decision to be made lightly. However, if you’re thinking about buying this year, now is the time to buy and finance your new home with VCNB.

Here at VCNB we have experienced lenders who will help you along the way. Plus, now through June 30, qualified borrowers will receive a $500 closing cost credit with a new home purchase mortgage!

The $500 Closing Cost offer is valid for applications received April 1, 2018 through June 30, 2018. This offer is only available for purchase mortgage transactions of a new, single family, owner-occupied primary residence. All loans are subject to underwriting and property approval. Not all applicants will qualify for this promotional offer. The $500 closing cost offer will be in the form of a lender credit and will be applied at the time of closing. Other restrictions and limitations may apply.

What are you waiting for? There is no better time than the present to finance your new home with VCNB! Click here for details and to find a lender in your neighborhood!

NMLS# 483350

How to Save for a Down Payment

The tallest hurdle to buying your first home will be saving for the down payment. To avoid having to purchase private mortgage insurance, you’ll likely need to put down at least 20% of the purchase price, which will probably mean tens of thousands of dollars.

As a young adult, saving this much money may seem impossible — like climbing a mountain. When you climb a mountain, it looks huge from afar. But if you take one step, then another, pretty soon you’ve reached the top, and the view is great.

Figure out how much you need to save
No matter the amount you have to save, approach it as a challenge. First, figure out exactly how much house you can really afford with the help of a home loan calculator. The calculator uses your inputs (income, expenses, debt) along with local tax data to recommend how much home you can afford — and how much of a down payment you’ll need.

Figure out what you spend now
If you don’t know exactly what your monthly expenses are, track all your spending for a month and analyze it to see where you can cut back. Think realistically about what you can sacrifice each month to reach your savings goal.

Cut out the small stuff
By now you’ve probably heard you should skip the daily latte and brown-bag your lunch, but those are savings cliches for a reason: They really do add up.

Something else that can add up: using coupons for your grocery shopping. Get familiar with the BOGO (buy one, get one) days at your local stores. With smartphone apps, you no longer need to clip and save paper coupons to present at checkout.

To save money on entertainment, rent movies through a subscription service such as Netflix or, even better, check out movies from your library. Libraries also frequently offer lectures, book groups and kids’ programs. Look for other free community events at your local parks and take advantage of free-admission days at museums.

Find a high-yield savings account
Earning as much interest as possible will help ignite your savings. You can find high-yield savings accounts at Internet banks, credit unions or community banks. When you open the account, add an automatic withdrawal from your paycheck so you won’t be tempted to spend money earmarked for the down-payment fund.

Sell what you don’t need
You might want to declutter before you move into your first home, so why not start by selling stuff you don’t want or need? If your neighborhood puts on a community garage sale, join in. Or sell your unwanted stuff on eBay, Craigslist or via a Facebook “virtual garage sale” page for your area.

Enlist family and friends
No, don’t ask your friends to give you money. Instead, let them know that saving for the down payment is your No. 1 priority. If your friends want to go out for dinner, suggest you get together for homemade pizza or a potluck at home. Chances are you’ll have a much more memorable evening.

The bottom line
Saving for a down payment can seem like a high mountain to climb, but if you look at it as a challenge, it can also be fun. And just imagine the feeling of accomplishment when you’re relaxing someday in a home of your own.

© Copyright 2016 NerdWallet, Inc. All Rights Reserved

How to Tell You’re Ready to Buy a House

Making the decision to become a homeowner is emotionally and financially complex. Here are some key things to ask yourself if you’re considering whether buying is right for you.

Do you have a good reason to buy?
Sometimes switching from renting to buying is a no-brainer.  Maybe you live in a modern one-bedroom apartment in a chic part of town, but you have a baby on the way. If you want a place in a good school district, with more square footage and a yard, buying may well be your best bet.

Other times, the urge to buy is driven by emotion: You see a house you like and you “just know.” There’s nothing wrong with that reaction, but take time to check out the property before you make any commitments. If it’s too far from work, near a noisy road or the best house on a bad block, it may not be as good a deal as it first appears.

And remember: Houses go on the market all the time, and there are tens of millions of single-family homes and condos in the U.S. So there’s no need to worry if your first choice doesn’t work out; your home is out there.

Can you make the upfront investment?
Buying a home requires an initial investment that you can’t ignore.

First, many lenders require a down payment of 20% of the home price. That’s $40,000 for a home that costs $200,000, about the median price in America. You’ll also owe closing costs, which could include loan-origination fees, discount points, appraisal fees, survey fees, underwriting fees, title search fees, and title insurance. Those could total another few thousand dollars.

The expenses don’t end there. You’ll want to hire an independent inspector to look for defects in a home before you buy.  This will cost several hundred dollars, but could save you thousands in repairs. And then there are moving costs, state or city taxes, utilities installation and the costs of changes you might want to make to the home — such as new flooring or painting — that are easiest to do while it’s empty.

This isn’t meant to scare you off; buying a home is still a smart choice for many people, despite the costs. But it does take a lot of cash.

Can you afford the upkeep?
Your mortgage payment might be fixed for the next 30 years, but your property taxes and insurance rates can rise. And if you didn’t make a 20% down payment, you’ll have to buy private mortgage insurance, or PMI, until you have 20% equity in your home. It costs about $165 per month on a $200,000 loan.

Once you’re a homeowner, you’ll also have to pay certain utility bills that might have been included in your rent. And you’ll be responsible for maintenance: double-pane windows one year, a new garage door the next, fixes to the roof five years up the road. It adds up.

These numbers are based on averages.  Plug your specific figures into a rent-or-buy calculator to find out if you’re ready for homeownership. And know that there is no one answer that’s right for everybody. Whether you keep renting or buy, your decision should be right for you alone.

© Copyright 2016 NerdWallet, Inc. All Rights Reserved

 

Four Reasons to Buy a Home Instead of Renting

The financial benefits of buying a home compared with renting have yoyoed over the years, especially of late. If you’re sitting on the fence, here are four circumstances in which it may be a better bet to buy.

If interest rates remain low
From a financing perspective, if this isn’t the best time to buy a house, it’s pretty darn close.

The average interest rate on a 30-year fixed mortgage, the most common variety, has hovered below or near 4% for several months now. For comparison’s sake, if you bought 10 years ago, the average interest rate was 6.41%. In 1996, it was 7.81%, and in 1981 it was a whopping 16.63%.

Although the Federal Reserve has begun to inchrates upward, it is likely that it will do so slowly and that it will be a while before the cost of borrowing to buy a home stops being historically low.

If home prices level off
Home prices rose steadily in the 1970s, ’80s, ’90s and 2000s before plunging around 2007, and in the past few years they have been climbing again. Different markets have seen different trends, of course, but generally what’s at play is supply and demand: More potential buyers than houses available means sellers can dictate terms and get top dollar.

But something interesting is happening: The oft-told story that millennials are renting for longer or living with their parents nowadays is not entirely accurate. No, people in this age group (born between 1981 and 1997) want very much to own a home, but they are putting it off because of real and imagined difficulties in affording it.

That could mean fewer potential buyers and a cooling of the upward surge in home prices. While others wait, you could pounce.

If rental costs continue rising
Real estate researcher Reis Inc. reports that apartment rents rose 4.6% in 2015. In hot housing markets such as California and the Pacific Northwest, rents are going up by about 14% per year.  According to Zillow, the median asking price nationwide for a rental was $1,575 per month in early 2016.

The monthly payment on a $200,000 mortgage — about the average in the U.S. — with a 4% interest rate would be just over $950. Even with taxes, insurance and maintenance, it’s tough to make a financial case in favor of renting.

If you want to save money
Home values over the past 70 years have generally tracked with inflation. Yes, you could make more money in the stock market. But we’re talking real life, not investment advice. Consider two things:

  • Your rent is locked in for a year or two, then will go up. Your mortgage payment can be the same for 30 years.
  • If you are raising a family, it seems all but impossible to save money. But when you sell the house after 30 years (or 20 or 10), someone will hand you hundreds of thousands of dollars, money that could put the kids through college or finance your retirement.

© Copyright 2016 NerdWallet, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Pickaway County Banking Center Donates $25,000 to Circleville City Schools

Circleville Schools Donation (PCBC) 3-18

Pictured, from left, are Branch Manager Jessica Calder, Junior Sarah Moats, Senior Meghan Brooks, Junior Abigail Keaton and Vinton County National Bank Senior Vice President Jodi Motta.

The staff at our Pickaway County Banking Center was thrilled this week to donate $25,000 to the Circleville City Schools for a facilities expansion of their campus softball complex. Since becoming a part of the Pickaway County community in 2014, bank leaders have sought meaningful and lasting ways to contribute to the betterment of Circleville and Pickaway County. Investing in this sports complex will have a long lasting impact for scores of future student athletes in Circleville.

“We invest in the communities we serve,” said Branch Manager Jessica Calder. “That is one of our core values and something we live by each and every day as an organization and as individual employees. Schools are the foundation of our communities and therefore we know that an investment in Circleville City Schools is money well spent,” she said.

The funds will help with the completion of a new softball complex that will include four fields and a building to house concessions and bathrooms. It will be used by high school and middle school teams.

“Time and time again this community has stepped up to help us provide a high quality educational experience, in high quality facilities, for our greatest asset, our students,” said School Superintendent Jonathan Davis. “The Pickaway County Banking Center’s substantial donation is an endearing continuation of such community commitment to our students and I cannot thank them enough for their investment in our Tigers,” Davis said.

The Pickaway County Banking Center is located at 120 S. Court St. in downtown Circleville and recently underwent renovations to beautify the bank’s façade.

 

Small Business Spotlight: Clary Trucking

Small businesses are important to communities and running a small business is tough work. That’s why we feature a small business in one of our communities every month!  

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Talk to Dan Clary about his family’s business for very long and it’s easy to understand the company’s values. Family, hard work, honesty and fairness are not just words in a mission statement but a way of life for the owners and employees of Clary Trucking.

The company is now celebrating its 71st year in business and has grown by leaps and bounds since Dan’s grandpa Jesse Clary, Sr. bought his first truck to haul school coal in 1947. Today the fourth generation family business has an impressive fleet of iconic red Kenworth trucks but they maintain a strong connection to where they have come from and the values that have made them successful.

It all started in 1947 when Jesse Clary Sr. bought that first truck to haul school coal. The next year he bought an International wrecker truck to use for towing services. Then in 1956, on his sixteenth birthday, Jesse Clary, Jr. acquired his driver’s license and began hauling aggregate material and household coal. “Grandpa was a mechanic and happy to do what he did. He was comfortable in his own skin but he didn’t want to deal much with people,” Dan explained. “But he told dad, if he wanted to deal with people, he could do more.”

That’s when the company began to grow. When Jesse Sr. passed away in 1970, the company was hauling coal and was transporting base material for the construction of Route 32, the Appalachian Highway, which cuts through several southern Ohio counties.

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Jesse and Patricia Clary are revered by their family for the work they have done to grow the business.

His dad Jesse and mom Patricia grew the business to fifteen trucks that hauled coal, foundry sand and asphalt. Their three children, Rick, Dan and Jackie all joined the family business in the seventies and, by 1978, Clary Trucking had outgrown their location, causing them to move into a new, larger facility in Richmond Dale.

“Mom and Dad did everything by themselves for years, until us kids came of age and could help,” Dan recalled with admiration. “Mom did the bookkeeping at the house and answered the phone. All while they were raising the kids. Dad likes to tell the story that he had six dollars in his pocket when they got married and that’s all the money they had.”

Dan credits his hardworking parents for building the business on a strong foundation and for instilling in their kids and grandkids the value of hard work and growing the business smartly. Jesse Jr. and Patricia have been married for sixty years and, as a team, helped the business grow to what it is today.

And what it is today is impressive.

In 2003 the company had grown so much it moved to a new, larger facility on Eastern Avenue in Chillicothe. Among other things, the facility has a welcoming office space, warehousing and cross-docking capabilities.

With more than fifty trucks and over 130 trailers, Clary Trucking now employs 54 people, including ten who are Clary family. Dan’s sister Jackie, wife Jody, nephew Ben and son’s Scott and John are all part of the operation.

Many of their employees have been with the company for decades, others have retired from there, while some even have grown children who now work for the company. Many employees have been there so long they are like family. They have four employees with a combined total of 175 years working with the company. “Carol, Ron, Wayne and David are very much appreciated. We don’t know what we’d do without them,” Dan said as he talked about folks who have spent their careers with the company.

“We have a good crew of people here. We couldn’t do it without them,” Dan continued. “We have good people and good customers and we learn how to get along with everyone to make it work. One of the best parts of the business is having the family here and that we get along. We don’t fuss and fight. We all pitch in and, for the most part, we’re all pretty universal. We can do each other’s jobs. If it takes extra effort to make something work, you’ve just gotta do it.”

Dan talked about the effect this attitude has on the morale of employees. The drivers notice that the family shows up and works just like they do. “One guy told me once ‘you work with us. You don’t just show up and go home.’ And that’s true. We aren’t living a high life. We live pretty modestly and we work hard to be where we are. We’re not out buying race cars or anything like that,” he laughed.

Dan takes pride in how they do everything in-house. From accounting to mechanics to technology and everything in between, they are completely self-sufficient. “We want things to be done right. It’s that simple. We have found that if we want it done our way, it’s a lot easier to just do it,” Dan observed.

He also emphasized the importance of the company’s good reputation and of doing the right thing, pointing out that they have worked hard to diversify the business and investments to stay on firm financial ground. “You never want to find yourself in the position that you can’t afford to do the right thing. It hasn’t always been easy but we do our best to do the right thing,” he emphasized. “I tell our drivers, it’s not a sin to make a mistake. It is a sin to not own up to it so we can make it right with the customer.”

While some might say they are old fashioned, the Clary family stands by the values that got them to where they are today.

“I want to see us get to a hundred years. But that won’t happen without work. When I was eighteen, I thought growing the business was the hard part and it would be easy once we got there,” Dan reminisced. “I know now it takes as much effort to stay here as it took to get here and we are grateful every day.”

Today, about fifty percent of their business is outside of Ohio and their regular routes include Louisville, Detroit, Charleston, South Carolina and Roanoke, Virginia. “We have grown a lot through our customers because they need something and you have to take care of your customers. You never want to say no if you don’t have to,” Dan explained.

Along with that growth has come countless changes, especially in technology used for operations and for managing their fleet of trucks on the road every day. “Dad, he’s amazed by it, by how much has changed and how quickly it changes,” he acknowledged.

But as they say – the more things change, the more they stay the same. Family and hard work are as important today as they were in 1947 when Jesse Sr. bought that first truck.

At 77 years young, Jesse and Patricia are semi-retired but Jesse still drives a truck whenever he can. They spend part of their year in Florida with their pride and joy – their dog Daisy. The pair have six grandchildren and seven great grandchildren.

“We’re grateful to be here working and for the people we work with. We’re grateful that everyone is healthy and happy and that we can still be here. It’s been a great life,” Dan said.

Learn more about Clary Trucking at their website.

Why Teens Need a Checking Account

VCNB began offering a student checking account a few years ago in response to a growing number of teens and parents who requested it. There is significant value to a teenager having an age appropriate checking account and we are optimistic that this generation of teens will be more financially savvy because of it.

After all, a teen will be an adult in a few short years. Whether they are headed straight to the workforce or to higher education, your teen soon will experience some degree of independence. Helping them establish good money habits at a young age is an important way to give them a good start to adulthood.

Here’s some food for thought:

Expense tracking and budgeting
Having a checking account teaches teenagers the very basic of skill of not spending more than they have as well as how to record expenses and debits. In general, it helps them develop budgeting skills they will use for a lifetime.

Independence, good habits and financial responsibility
As a parent, you have spent years managing every aspect of your child’s life. While you may not like to think about it, soon your teen will be an adult who needs to make responsible decisions. Independence starts in the teen years and helping them make sound decisions with their money is part of preparing them for adulthood. Habits are created every day – work with them and use a checking account to teach them good ones

Safer than cash
We notice that many of our student checking accounts are opened by teens who are going on school field trips, sometimes out of country. It’s far safer to travel distances or even just around town with a debit card than with a pocketful of cash.

Check out this link to learn more about Student Checking My Way at VCNB. You’ll find this account listed under the Checking Accounts tab.