COVID-19 Update: We’re Here For You

A lot has happened in the last few weeks and here at VCNB we have been working to stay on top of the latest developments. Our goal every day is to provide our customers with the services you need and deserve while keeping our employees and all of you as safe as possible.

As you know, the Ohio Department of Health has issued a Stay at Home mandate that is effective through April 6. Banks are a vital part of our country’s infrastructure and we offer important services to you. At this time, our lobbies are currently closed, but our drive-thrus are still open. In order to minimize face to face contact, we are encouraging our customers to use our online banking, mobile banking and local branch ATMs and drive thrus. We realize that may not always be possible, so we are allowing customers into our lobbies by appointment only in order to limit the face-to-face exposure for both our customers and employees. Should you need to make an appointment, please contact your local branch or call 800.542.5004. We appreciate our customers patience with us during this time.

We are taking steps to keep the drive-thru tubes and ATM keypads clean but we still encourage you to keep hand sanitizer in your car as a precaution.

Safety for our people is a priority that we take most seriously. That’s why we have been proactive in practicing social distancing and in encouraging employees to keep work areas, common employee areas, and public spaces as clean as possible.

Many of our employees must report to the office but there are a lot who can telecommute and we are actively deploying technology necessary for them to do so. Meanwhile, we have also eliminated travel among our branches and are encouraging conference calls or web meetings instead.

We know that many of you are experiencing financial hardship and uncertainty related to COVID-19. With that in mind, we do have some relief options available to personal and commercial customers. If you think you may need help, do not hesitate to ask. Simply call our Customer Service Team at 1.800.542.5004 and they will direct you to the banker who can best help your individual situation.

No matter what you do, be sure to wash your hands often and don’t touch your face after handling anything in public. If you’re on the front lines working in vital areas like farming, retail sales, the food industry, trucking, health care, first response, or one of the many other areas that’s keeping our state going, we thank you. Be safe and take care of yourself.

Please know that social distancing isn’t the same as social isolation. Your bankers are still here for you. Have a question for your banker? Call us at 1.800.542.5004 or chat with us from our website. Member FDIC.

COVID-19 Update: Working To Serve You

VCNB_V_CMYKPart of being a community bank is being a good neighbor and steward of the communities where we do business. That’s why we have taken steps to protect our employees, customers and neighbors against the spread of COVID-19.

On Thursday, we made the very difficult decision to close lobbies and to direct all customers to our drive-thru. Our customers who require in-lobby assistance can complete their business simply by calling to discuss options or to make an appointment. Call your local branch or our Customer Service Team at 1.800.542.5004.

Much of your business can be completed online or with VCNB Mobile. You can access accounts, transfer funds, open accounts, and apply for a loan online. You can even deposit a check using the mobile app and skip the post office using Online Bill Pay.

Our Customer Service Team is also waiting for your calls at 1.800.542.5004 and prepared to chat online, a service available from the homepage of our website.

We often say that we have seen it all in our 153 year history.  However, none of us can recall a time that we’ve limited lobby access to customers at our branches for a pandemic. Despite the uncertainty you may be feeling, we can assure you that your money is safe in the bank and that we’ll be here for you whenever you need us.

Relief Options
We understand that many of our customers will face financial uncertainty due to the events surrounding this pandemic. VCNB will offer some relief options and will be happy to discuss with you all your individual needs and concerns. If you are experiencing hardship caused by COVID-19, please call our Customer Service Team at 1.800.542.5004. They can direct you to the right person to discuss relief options available regarding your particular situation.

Banking Options
Online Banking – Many of our customers already choose to bank online with us every day. With Online Banking, you can open accounts, apply for loans, transfer funds, pay bills, and do much more. If you haven’t used it before, click here to view a tutorial and to register for Online Banking today.

VCNB Mobile – Carry the bank with you in your pocket!  Download this mobile app from the app store on your mobile device. Here you can pay bills, transfer funds, check balances, open an account and even deposit a check using your camera’s device.

Mobile Deposit – Customers who use VCNB Mobile can deposit a check from anywhere in the world by using the camera on their mobile device.  Want instructions? Click here! It’s a free service!

Telebanc – Our Telebanc telephone service is also available to you 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Simply call 1-800-317-5990 and you’ll have access to all of your accounts at your fingertips.

By Appointment – We have closed lobby doors to slow spread of the virus. However, you can still access in-lobby services if you require them. Simply call your local branch or our Customer Service Team at 1.800.542.5004 to discuss your options.  You will still receive the same great service you have come to expect from your neighborhood VCNB branch. We just have to be smart about how we serve you until this threat has passed.

Scams
Sadly, times of crisis and hardship often bring out the worst in people. Be aware of potential scams. If something sounds too good to be true, it probably is and always question the motives of someone trying to gain access to your home or who is asking for money.

We know these are uncertain times but please understand we are still open and here for you. Our core values guide us as we attempt to always do the right thing, to honor the relationships we have with our customers, and to be forward thinking in how we offer you the best service possible.

We will continue to monitor the advice given by Ohio Governor Mike DeWine, the Ohio Department of Health as well as the CDC. Please continue to look here for the latest news on our bank and how we are working to serve you through the challenges to come.

COVID-19 Update

ATTENTION CUSTOMERS

In order to protect against the spread of Covid-19 and for the health of our employees and loyal customers, effective March 20, 2020, our branches will be available by Drive Thru Only.  If a customer requires in-branch assistance to do their banking, we ask that you contact the branch directly or contact our customer service team at 800.542.5004 so they can discuss with you how our team can best serve your needs.  For our Jackson Branch customers, we will be practicing social distancing by allowing one person in the lobby at a time due to the fact that no drive thru is available.

We realize this may come at an inconvenience for some, but want to assure you that there are many ways to conduct your daily banking business in addition to the drive thru.  Our branch ATMs will be available to do deposits and withdrawals.  In addition, you can withdrawal money surcharge free from any Moneypass ATM Nationwide.  To find an ATM near you, visit moneypass.com.  We encourage you to download the VCNB Mobile App to conduct transfers, pay bills, deposit checks and more. Our Customer service team will be on stand-by to assist you via phone at 800.542.5004 or via online chat through VCNBFamily.com.  Through our website you can also open accounts and apply for loans.

We are guided by our mission to do the right thing for our customers and our employees.  We are closely monitoring the situation and the recommendations by Ohio Governor Mike Dewine and the CDC and will update you as soon as anything changes.  Thank you for your cooperation.

A Message From Our President On COVID-19

At VCNB, our customers are like family. Like you, we’ve been following the news and focusing on ways to keep our employees and customers healthy and safe. We are encouraging our employees to monitor their own health and to practice good hygiene to prevent the spread of germs. We are also taking steps to clean our common areas and restrooms more frequently to keep the bank as safe as possible for everyone.

Mark sitting on deskOur customers are always welcome in our branches. However, we do want to remind customers that many banking activities can be handled online or with VCNB Mobile. You can access accounts, transfer funds, open accounts and apply for a loan online. You can even deposit a check using the mobile app and skip the post office using Online Bill Pay.

Our Customer Service Team is ready for your calls at 1.800.542.5004 and prepared to chat online from the homepage of our website.

Here at VCNB we are guided by our values to serve our communities, to build relationships with our customers and to be forward thinking in how we provide our customers with the best service possible. We will continue to monitor the advice given by the Ohio Governor and Department of Health as well as the CDC. Visit the CDC website for the latest news and recommendations.

Thank you for being a loyal customer,
Mark Erslan

VCNB President

Small Business Spotlight: Robert K. Fox Family YMCA

YMCA - Debt Free - Ron Collins with Board of DirectorsThe Robert K. Fox Family YMCA in Fairfield County was one of the first stories in our Small Business Spotlight series. Many exciting things have happened here since that first spotlight in 2015.

The latest and most exciting piece of news is that theorganization heads into this new decade debt-free!  That’s right – the loan taken out for their nearly twenty year improvement project was paid off at the beginning of this year thanks in large part to the generosity of an anonymous donor who has been contributing to the cause for nearly a decade.  This project officially got under way in 2000, allowing for the expansion and renovation of the main campus. Paying it off has allowed the program – and its personnel – to breathe a little easier.

CFO Kerry Sheets recalled how it came about.  “I remember it was Christmas time in 2013, which is already a stressful time.  And an individual approached our office and said they wanted to help.”  The donor laid out a plan and committed monies on the spot – seven payments over seven years to be exact.

“I cried.  Oh, I cried” Kerry recalled.  Without this donor, the YMCA in 2008 would have faced some hard decisions.  Operating funds were being set aside in order to ensure payment of the huge loan they had undertaken, and expenses were being evaluated.  After the donor’s offer, the situation essentially changed overnight.  “And sure enough, I woke up, came in one morning, and there is a donation check waiting for us.”  This continued six additional times, and was a key factor in the Y’s ability to celebrate their “Debt-Free 2020.”

In addition to paying off the loan, they also recently opened the River Valley Campus (RVC) branch, a brand new second location created in partnership with Fairfield Medical Center.  Officially opening in September 2019, the RVC was a years-long project that evolved far beyond the initial concept.

“We were approached initially by Fairfield Medical Center who were in the planning stages and they had some ideas about child care” said Robert K. Family Fox YMCA’s CEO, Howard Long.  The YMCA was intrigued by the potential partnership, so as the ideas began to flow and the model for what the medical center could be began to evolve, so too did the Y’s involvement in the project.

“We all have the same goals.  We just want the community to be healthy” explained Howard.  It made the partnership a no brainer, and what came out of it was a brand new, fully functional YMCA facility, operated and maintained by YMCA employees.

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From day one the public response to the spacious facility and the latest and greatest in exercise science equipment has been nothing but positive.  “It’s been an amazing partnership” Howard beamed, before referring to the value the new facility adds for Fairfield Medical Center, the YMCA, and their members.  “Our brand has a value and that was recognized.  Our logo is prominently displayed.  It’s fully functional – a brand new second branch.  It’s instant value for our members!”

The RVC has quickly become a model for YMCA programs across the state to follow.  “I’m taking calls and meetings all the time” said Howard.  “They want to know how we did it, and this is really a model of how to do it right.”

But Y members will be happy to know that the newest locationisn’t the only facility getting all of the attention.  The main branch’s Wellness Center has seen updated carpeting, equipment, and HVAC systems, and the RecPlex continues to see growth.  The gymnastics program, in particular, has seen explosive growth and now requires the use of the facility’s second floor.  Additionally, their childcare program has grown significantly and has expanded into the former Sanderson Elementary School building.

This physical growth and expansion is in addition to program success – old and new – at the Y.  For example, Darkness to Light, a newer offering featuring the Stewards to Children program that Howard has been involved with since before his arrival to Fairfield County in 2018, helps adults learn how to prevent, recognize, and react responsibly to child sexual abuse.  To date, 253 adults have been trained through this program in Fairfield County. Our strong partnership with the Harcum House and United Way have made this program possible.

To say that the staff here is pleased with this growth would be an understatement.

However, all of the success and growth of the Robert K. Family Fox YMCA program would not be possible without the numerous donors and partners that contribute a tremendousamount of support.

Someone else who played a huge role in the YMCA we know today was the organization’s namesake – Dr. Robert and Dorothy Fox. “Without the Fox family and their foundation, the (main campus) addition wouldn’t exist.  We truly wouldn’t be where we are today without the generosity of them and their continued financial support,” Kerry said.

Donations from the community go directly into the Y’s Annual Giving Campaign (AGC), which topped $210,000 in 2019.  As part of that $210k, over $10,000 came from the generosity of the selfless YMCA staff members themselves.  Fittingly, the success of the AGC meant that the YMCA turned no one away in 2019 for their inability to pay.

If you’re interested in joining the Robert K. Family Fox YMCA, consider their Better Together program – a referral program that can earn you a savings of 20 percent.  For more information, contact Annie Weaver at 740.654.0616 x234 or at aweaver@ymcalancaster.org.

For full information on the Robert K. Fox Family YMCA and their programs, visit them online and follow all their latest happenings on Facebook.

 

Small Business Spotlight: Georgie Emerson Vintage

Small businesses are important to communities and running a business is tough work. That’s why we feature a small business in one of our communities every month!

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Coming home. That’s how it feels when you enter Georgie Emerson Vintage.

Here you will find a comfortable atmosphere filled with beautiful things. Here you will find kind people who can’t wait to see what you have chosen. You will find laughter and a sense of belonging that will make you want to stay and shop just a little longer.

In every nook and cranny you will find something special, something you won’t find in any other store. Not to mention Pippa, the precious rescue dog who presides over the shop, accepting kisses, ear scratches and other forms of attention lavished on her by loyal shoppers and admirers.

1D4F8768-A1DC-419C-BCB9-9D82B4C2E06AWhen Polly McCormick was a little girl and people asked what she wanted to be when she grew up, she said Nels Olsen on Little House on the Prairie. “I always wanted to be Nels, to have that store counter. So I would play general store and my parents would be my customers,” she laughed.

Today she owns what she calls a vintage lifestyle shop with an enormous sales counter, large rolls of paper and twine, and an atmosphere that would make Nels proud.

She described her childhood with a mother who took her to yard sales, flea markets and auctions. They would find old pieces to clean, reimagine and transform into treasures. “She taught me to paint, sew, craft – I guess you could say it’s in my blood,” she said.

Yet, the road from playing mercantile to owning one was long and painful at times. She had a corporate career for several years and was working as Human Resources Manager for Big Lots when her parents fell ill and she took time off to care for them. After her father died, Polly said she worked to keep her mom in her own home for about seven years. During that time, Polly opened a booth at an antique mall, quietly growing this business and working part time at the antique mall where she learned about working retail.

It was after her mother passed in 2012 that Polly was feeling a little lost and the seeds of Georgie Emerson were planted.  With encouragement and support from her husband Mick, a small shop in downtown Canal was born. But that first 485 square foot shop was short lived as the business grew quickly. In fact, they are now in their fourth location, a 5,000 square foot space that allows Polly and her girls and guys to play with displays and to create charming vignettes at every turn.

Her girls and guys are a few of the 29 local people who create handmade items that are available only at Georgie Emerson.  Some helped Polly look past dirt and junk to transform their current location from cavernous to cozy. “I couldn’t have done it without their help. I might not be here if it weren’t for them,” she said.

Those 29 artists and artisans from Canal Winchester, Lancaster, Pickerington, Ashville and points in between work in a number of mediums  including ceramics, woodworking, crafting, sewing, metalwork, jewelry and painting. These Georgie Emerson exclusive items give the shop a sense of handmade flair to accompany fine quality vintage and antique items, and carefully curated reproduction pieces.

Clothing and accessories, furniture, wall art and a host of decorative items pack the store without feeling overwhelming

Polly finds inspiration in French country as well as modern farmhouse, using a palette of soft colors, beautiful textures and weathered patinas to create a sophisticated yet simple and warm environment.  “And fun! We want people to have fun with their homes. We want them to have fun with us,” she exclaimed. “I want people to feel like they got a hug when they visit here. Having a bad day? Shop here and you’ll laugh, you’ll be inspired, you can pet a dog and be happy,” she gushed while gesturing toward Pippa tucked away in her bed on the counter. Little Pippa presides over the shop, eager to meet a new friend and to greet an old one. People frequently pick her up, cuddling the affectionate little dog while they browse.

While Pippa clearly enjoys the attention, it seems her human friends gain something special from the interaction as well.  “People just love Pippa and you can tell it makes their day better having her here,” Polly said.

Pippa isn’t the only one to give special attention to customers. Watch Polly interact with customers for a few minutes and it is clear that she takes an interest in everyone who comes in. She knows their birthdays, the names of their pets and what they purchased last time. She inquires about a sick grandmother and about whether someone else is ready for their big move. She’s so friendly and engaging with everyone around her that the store takes on the atmosphere of a slumber party at times.

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“I guess I’m kind of a dreamer and have a bit of gypsy soul,” she said. “But in all my dreams, I never imagined it would become what it is today.”

The store that began as a tiny shop in 2012 continues to grow. Soon they will open Georgie Celebrates, a classroom space that will be available for rent for small parties. Polly expects the space to be available by spring.

Want to visit? George Emerson Vintage is located at 360 West Waterloo Street in Canal Winchester. They are open Thursday and Friday from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Have questions?  Call 614.562.9938 or ask them on Facebook.  They go live on Facebook at least once a week and often post pictures and videos of new merchandise so be sure to follow them for the latest news!

Want to see more of the merchandise? Check out the slideshow below!

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Elaine Prater To Retire This Month

Elaine praterWhen Elaine Prater started at the bank in Richmond Dale, she was a part time teller with no thoughts of making it a career. The bank was close to home and to her kids’ school, providing a convenient opportunity to make some extra money.

More than 38 years have passed since then. She’s now the much beloved manager of that branch and is looking forward to her retirement on January 31. “In the beginning I worked as part time teller on Monday, Friday, Saturday and on the first and third of the month. I covered vacations too,” she laughed.

“I discovered that I really enjoyed the people and I never left,” she said.

The branch changed hands a few times over the years before joining the VCNB family in 2008. Over time she worked her way up to Branch Manager, a position she’s held since 1997. “I’ve been a banker for 38 years and worked for four banks but I’ve done it all right here!” she exclaimed.

During that time she’s witnessed significant changes in the industry and the way customers want to bank. “When I started we didn’t have a single computer in the branch. Then we got a computer for behind the teller line and now we all have computers. It’s really changed the way we work,” she said.

Elaine also remembers when ATMs and online banking were introduced. “Our customers loved the ATM but the thing that impressed them the most was online banking. Customers were quick to adopt to banking with their own computer, being able to do things for themselves,” she said. “Some of our older customers still don’t use online banking and we have people who can’t get internet at home but that’s ok. We can help them in other ways. That’s the beautiful thing about being a community banker,” she said.

She went on to talk about the many ways community bankers can look out for their customers. “Sometimes we balance checkbooks. We know the families including all the kids and grandkids. Sometimes we just visit with them,” she said. “When I ask a customer how they’re doing, it means something to me. It means a lot to know that they’re ok or that I can help when there’s a problem. It means something knowing that I can be happy for them when there’s good news. They’re not just customers. They’re all important to me,” she said.

Elaine looks forward to having the free time that comes with retirement but doesn’t necessarily intend to slow down. For example, she hopes to volunteer at the hospital. “It sounds kind of corny but I want to give back. I want to give comfort” she explained while remembering a time that her grandson was quite ill while in Guatemala, waiting for his adoption to be finalized. “I was so thankful he had compassionate people to care for him. He needed the surgery by the time he was six months old. When they stepped off the plane, he was already scheduled for surgery two weeks later, on the day he turned six months.

Elaine and her husband Gary recently celebrated 51 years of marriage and she’s looking forward to having more time with him. The pair work together running a concessions business that takes them to events across Ohio and Kentucky. They have two grown children and four grandkids. Two of those grandchildren live in California and it is her hope visit them soon. She would also like to continue volunteering with Salvation Army and remain active with her church.

She laughed when she talked about coming back to “visit with the girls” at the branch. I worked with Brenda for 22 years and Lauren for seventeen. That’s a long time to just stop coming around!”

“It’s hard to believe that it’s been so long. It’s been fun. We all have those days that it gets overwhelming or that it isn’t fun but I’m grateful for every single day. I’m grateful for the opportunities I’ve had here. I’ll miss the people but I think this is the right time to go,” she said.

Elaine’s last day will be on Friday, January 31. Customers can stop by the branch on January 29 to have cupcakes and visit with her.

Small Business Spotlight: Stuart Burial Vaults

Small businesses are important to communities and running a business is tough work. That’s why we feature a small business in one of our communities every month!

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This month’s Small Business Spotlight is with a business that recently celebrated its 100th anniversary. While they provide a service that most people need at some point in their lifetime, it isn’t the kind of business most of us frequent or even know exists.

Does this sound like a riddle?

It’s not really. The company in question is Stuart Burial Vaults, a family owned business that is still in their original building in Bremen.

“The vault is not what the public sees.  They know us for the tent they see when they arrive to the site in the funeral procession” says John Boone who is just the fifth owner of the 100 year old business.  “We take pride in the vaults we make as well as helping to provide a tasteful presentation for family and friends who want to honor their loved ones.”

Stuart Burial Vaults was started by John Stuart, a contractor and businessman who was making a name for himself in the early 1900s through his quality of work and his 9-bag mix of concrete.  As his reputation grew so did the size and importance of his projects.  He worked on bridges and roadways throughout the county that long outlived their expected lifecycle. He was even asked to consult with the construction of the Hoover Dam in Nevada!  Stuart was able to send his son to be on-site during the construction while he stayed home to run the vault business he created in 1919.

80424136_1488441691310400_2659597844519845888_nStuart Burial Vaults was actually one of the first four concrete vault businesses in the country.  In addition to creating and running the business, John Stuart was also a founding member of the National Burial Vault Association, which helped establish industry wide guidelines and standards.

“Just like Mr. Stuart 100 years ago, we work hard and take pride in what we do and we’re proud of it” John Boone beamed.

To say there is more than meets the eye to the business would be an understatement.  It’s not commonly known, but the customer base for a vault company is primarily made up of funeral directors.  Funeral directors order directly from the vault company. Then John and his team arrange for the delivery of the vault, the set-up of the presentation as well as the installment, tear-down, and return afterwards.

John estimates there are five appointments on the schedule of a typical day.  However, there have been more than twenty scheduled for a single day in the past. While this is a challenge, he credits his team’s professionalism and determination for always making it work out.  “If it can be done, we’ll find a way.  It’s amazing – we always work it out!”

Stuart Burial Vaults has nine trucks, a fleet of “buggies” for vault transport, and eleven employees on staff in addition to John.  John is tasked with orders, logistics, billing, and much of the day-to-day business dealings but he credits Foreman Delbert Hammer for making the business operate smoothly. “These guys are my heroes” John says repeatedly when referring to his team. “And Delbert is critical to our business.”

On days with fewer appointments, the crew works on creating and maintaining inventory.  That way, when they do have couple of days or weeks with busy schedules, they have the inventory to fulfill orders.

“The crew of guys we have now has been with me for years.  They can go out and wrestle a 2,000 pound vault in a muddy cemetery – handling it safely – and still have to bring a nice white tent back to me after it’s all said and done.  We have to have our tent look like this (points to pristine white tent in a photo) on a cold, wet, rainy, muddy, snowy day and still bring it back looking like this.”“They’re always on call.  Saturdays, holidays, bad days, good days.  We’re always on call just like police or doctors or firefighters.  These guys are my heroes.”

John first joined the Stuart team when he was sixteen and has spent most of his life in the business.  Now in his fifties, he owns the business after a lifetime of watching the industry and society evolve.  Cultural and societal shifts, insurance costs and coverage, costs associated with materials, and the wants and needs of funeral directors are things that have impacted the business.  “It didn’t change a bit for eighty years!  And now in the last decade things are changing quickly… but at the end of the day, it’s cement, sand, water, and gravel for us.  And it always will be.”

In addition to crediting his staff, John also credits his customers for the sustained success of the century year old business.

“My customers are great people.  I don’t have to worry and deal with some of the not-so-fun stuff that other businesses have to worry about.” John explained.  “Most of our customers have been with us for a long, long time.  Decades.” John explained. “I’m so lucky!”

Stuart Burial Vaults is located at 527 Ford Street, on their original site in Bremen. Visit their website to learn more. Friendly Bremen Banking Center and the VCNB financial family would like to congratulate John and his staff, and all of the previous owners and employees on reaching such a milestone!

 

 

Out With A Bang: Sheila Stickel Will Retire On New Year’s Eve

Sheila S.JPGWhen Sheila Stickel started with Vinton County National Bank in 1999, the bank had just three locations in McArthur, Wilkesville and Chillicothe. Much bank work was still done manually and online banking hadn’t even been invented.

Since then, the bank has expanded immensely and Sheila has worked in several branches and jobs, helping countless customers in many ways. But no matter her role here, Sheila always has the needs of the customer at heart.

That’s why her customers will be sad to learn that Sheila’s career with the bank will end when she retires on December 31.

A Vinton County native, Sheila worked for Society Bank in Columbus in the seventies and eighties before she went to an ophthalmic distributor where she sold equipment to eye doctors. When her sister, longtime VCNB lender Brenda Fee, called and suggested she apply for the Head Teller position in Chillicothe, Sheila thought it was worth a shot.

Today she is part of the VCNB Products and Services group, a team of five that tests, implements and maintains new products and services. They also assist both personal and business customers as well as bank employees who need help with those products and services.  She is well known to Business Online Banking customers as their go-to person for all answers about that class of products that she just calls “BOB.”

When she’s not helping customers, she’s busy generating several daily reports as well as monthly reports for lenders, New Accounts Offers and Personal Bankers.

Before going to Products and Services in 2012, Sheila worked directly with customers as Teller, Head Teller, New Accounts Officer and Branch Manager in a few different locations including West Fair Lancaster, Canal Winchester, Main Street Chillicothe, Laurelville and Tarlton. Since joining Products and Services, she has also worked in Ashville and Circleville, bringing the total number of branches she has worked in to seven.  She has visited all of the branches except the newest in Jackson. “I’m proud to say that I got to work in so many branches and see so many grow,” she said.

“I’ve seen the construction of some branches and the merging of some. We’ve gone from teller machines to online banking. Probably the most impressed I’ve been was going from the old teller machines to computers,” she smiled, explaining that teller machines were basically just large adding machines.

During the years before computers, everything was done manually. From manually stuffing statement envelopes to bundling up work for the Proof Department to process in another office, everything took longer and was more challenging than we find in the tech friendly bank of today. When the bank introduced online banking they held a contest for naming the product. Her entry “Bank to the Future” didn’t become the name of online banking but was used as the slogan. “I won a day off for the idea and Marketing went to town and used that to promote our Online Banking!”

Much has changed since Sheila won that contest as customers can now do almost all their business and personal banking online. “Today businesses can do almost everything they need with the click of a mouse. It just fascinates me how much control they have over their accounts and activities,” she said.

While she says she will miss the people, Sheila has a lot to look forward to including spending time with her recently retired husband and two grown children. She is especially excited to spend time with her seven year-old grandchild and a new grandbaby expected in June.

She looks forward to traveling some and to simply doing what she wants to do on her own time. “I have enjoyed my job but it’s time to hang up my hat,” she smiled. “Happy trails to me!”

The bank will celebrate Sheila’s retirement with a party on New Year’s Eve. Stop by the Pickaway County Banking Center in Circleville that day to wish Sheila good luck in this exciting new stage of her life!

 

 

 

Small Business Spotlight: Homegrown on Main

Small businesses are important to communities and running a business is tough work. That’s why we feature a small business in one of our communities every month!

Step inside Homegrown on Main and it feels a little like coming home. First you notice the aroma of candles and homemade soaps. Then you spot the wood floors and character of a remodeled old building before your eyes focus on an array of finely crafted local items.

Once your eyes settle on the shelves of pottery, baskets of photos and artful displays of jewelry and wood items, it’s hard to look away.

This store on Logan’s Main Street is home to 53 artists and craftspeople who create unique works of art from their homes and studios around the Hocking Hills region. Store Manager Rose Arthur smiles as she discusses the merchandise they sell that cannot be found anywhere else. “I love that we have such a variety of high quality work,” she said. “These are things you cannot buy anywhere else.”

The variety of mediums represented here is impressive – woodworking, fused glass, painting, blown glass, drawing, photography, candle making, writing, leather work, jewelry, pottery, knitting, sewing, crochet, alcohol inks and paper goods can be found here, representing a range of tastes and prices.

They also sell items to help local organizations including Empty Bowls, the Washboard Festival, Hemlock Heroes, the Hocking County Historical and Genealogical Society and Logan in Bloom.

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“It’s a lot to look at and take in. I think you see something different every time you walk through, Rose said. “We have some regulars who come in just to see what’s new so the artists are often changing their inventory and trying new things.”

For example, painter Donna Voelkel was inspired by peers creating alcohol inks. With some research and practice, she has mastered innovative techniques for embellishing alcohol inks, creating something entirely fresh and new. At the age of 84, she is proving that it’s always a good time to do something innovative.

This storefront was actually born from the ashes of the region’s beloved Hocking Hills State Park Dining Lodge which was destroyed by fire in 2016. Members of the Hocking Hills Artists and Craftsmen Association sold their creations at the lodge.

In addition to losing their art to the fire, they lost retail space as well.

That’s when the group began devising a new plan with the help of the Hocking Hills Tourism Association, the local organization aimed at bringing tourism to the community. Efforts were already underway to revitalize downtown Logan and it made sense for the partnership to be part of the revival by opening a retail store here.

The rest, as they say, is history. Today the partnership has strengthened and the interest in locally made art and crafts is ever growing. They’ve grown so much, in fact, that they outgrew the original location and have moved to a spacious storefront just down the street.

76993332_1485807894920285_3474159901402464256_nThe store is a popular stop for visitors who are looking to take home a vacation memory. “When people travel they like to take home a piece of the experience. For some that’s a painting or woodworking. Many people are collecting Christmas ornaments from their travels and we have those too,” she said.

But Homegrown on Main has a large appeal among locals too. She said that some customers come in  just to see what the store is about only to find that it’s a great source for gifts, handmade greeting cards or even something special for themselves.  “Locals are really starting to catch on and we’re so glad to have people in our community come in too,” she said.

Rose pointed out that most of the art represented at Homegrown on Main comes from people who have full time careers or other barriers that prevent them from being a full time artist with a storefront of their own. Having everyone work together in this partnership has improved visibility for the local artists, writers and musicians represented here.  They also act as a visitor’s center, answering questions, giving directions and distributing local information and maps.

One unique quality of this store is that shoppers can sometimes meet the artists during demonstrations. “People love to meet the artists at work and maybe even buy something from an artist they met who showed them how they do their work,” she said.  Some of the artists even offer workshops in their respected areas including basket weaving, glass, painting, knitting, water colors and jewelry.

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Rose hopes to see lots of new and familiar faces at the Holiday Open House they are planning for December 7. It will be held from noon to 6 p.m. and will include snacks, a door prize drawing, demonstrations and music by The Grace Notes from 3:30 to 5 p.m. The Logan Christmas Parade will also be held at 2 p.m. that day, making it the perfect time to stop by for a visit and some locally made gifts!

While there, be sure to check out their new holiday window display designed by Marcia Meyers. The Logan resident is known for her lifelike sculptures and Rose is certain that Santa will be a part of the festive window planned for reveal the day after Thanksgiving. If you’re out shopping on Black Friday or Small Business Saturday, be sure to stop in to see the window and find that perfect gift you won’t see in any big box store!

Homegrown on Main welcomes shoppers at their new location at 65 West Main Street in Logan.  They are open Monday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Follow them on Facebook for news and information including events like the Holiday Open House on December 7.