Looking Back On A Year Of Giving

Looking back on 2020, we can say this year has been unlike any other we’ve seen in our 153 year history. This global pandemic has changed the way we do business, how we are entertained, how we interact with loved ones, and in countless other ways.

It has been challenging and scary for many who are suffering economically or because of their health. That’s why we have committed to working with our customers who have struggled due to income loss this year. We also continue supporting our communities in the best way we know how – through volunteerism and monetary donations.

Our employees log hundreds of hours volunteering in their communities every year and have continued to do so when safe this year as well. You’ll find them helping at food pantries, serving on boards and lending a hand at animal shelters. They give blood, are leaders in their churches, visit nursing homes and seek other ways to make a difference.

Our branches have donated nearly $300,000 to causes important to their communities. Those causes come in many forms. We have supported events like the drive-thru Pataskala Cookie Walk, a Chamber event that gave local families a socially distanced and fun way to welcome the holidays.

We bought livestock at county fairs, supporting the age old tradition of 4-H members learning useful skills and responsibility while caring for their animals.

We’ve donated to some big projects too. The Logan Theater project will provide local teens a place to go after school and a place for movies to roll and the arts to come alive in downtown Logan.

Donations were made to high school programs, libraries, and food pantries. In McArthur, we donated care packages of non-perishable food and snacks to be sent home with local kids when schools were closed.

We even gave away $2,020 to a graduating high school senior from each of the counties where we have a branch.

Supporting our local communities and people and the causes important to them is important to us. As we bid farewell to 2020, we look with hope for the new year ahead. From our bank family to yours, we wish you a new year that is happy, healthy and prosperous.

Close to Home: VCNB Volunteerism is Important

At VCNB we encourage our employees to give back to our communities. We believe that a happy, healthy community is a good place to do business and that there is no better way to contribute to a community than through volunteerism.

Last year we had more than one hundred employees who did at least eight hours of community service. That’s more than 800 hours of time donated by our employees! The truly neat thing is that our folks contribute to all sorts of worthwhile projects.

We volunteer for animal shelters, summer reading programs and 4-H. Many of our employees work at food banks, helping to package and distribute grocery items to needy families. Some of our employees volunteer for school functions, boosters groups and even work concessions or ticket gates for high school sporting events.

We hope that our employees will give of their time to projects and organizations that are near and dear to their hearts and that will make a true difference. While we have so many employees doing good things across our seven counties, one of our most unique volunteers is Kathy Ramsay, Head Teller at our Salt Creek Banking Center in Laurelville.

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Kathy Ramsay is pictured with the quilt she made and donated to the Laurelville Fire Department. It raised $400 at auction.

Kathy is a kind hearted person who loves to sew. That’s why so many people in her family, in her community and across the world are benefactors of her hard work. Kathy makes quilts for the Quilts of Valor Project Foundation,  an organization that helps quilters like Kathy donate quilts to American soldiers who have been touched by war. Last year alone, she sent five quilts to soldiers stationed at the Ramstein Air Base in Germany.

But it doesn’t stop there. She donates baby quilts to Adena Hospital for little kids who need the comforting touch of home during their hospital stay. She donates handmade fleece hats for the Laurelville and Tarlton fire departments’ Toys for Tots programs and for the Sparrow House, an outreach ministry in South Perry.

This fall, she and some friends will spend a day at the elementary school in Laurelville, making hats for little kids in preschool. That’s about 60 hats these ladies will make for children between the ages of three and five. Best of all, the youngsters will pick out the fabric they like best and watch the hat be made.

She has made quilts for nearly every member of her family and commonly donates quilts for fundraisers.

This month, Kathy donated a beautiful red, white and blue Americana quilt to the Fireman’s Festival. The Fire Department auctioned the quilt at their 91st annual festival, raising $400 to help with the department’s operating expenses.

“I just really love to quilt and sew,” Ramsay said.

She estimates she has been involved in this hobby for 35 to 40 years. “I like trying new techniques, new fabrics. I’m inspired by trying new things,” she explained.