Banks NEVER Ask That

Can You Spot a Phishing Scam? Every day, thousands of people fall victim to fraudulent emails, texts and calls from scammers pretending to be their bank. And in this time of expanded use of online banking, the problem is only growing worse. In fact, the Federal Trade Commission’s report on fraud estimates that American consumers lost a staggering $1.9 billion to these phishing schemes and other fraud in 2019 — and the ongoing pandemic has only increased the threat. Imagine where we are in 2020.

It’s time to put scammers in their place.

Online scams aren’t so scary when you know what to look for. At Vinton County National Bank, we’re committed to helping you spot them as an extra layer of protection for your account. We’ve joined with the American Bankers Association and banks across the country in a nationwide effort to fight phishing—one scam at a time. We want every bank customer to become a pro at spotting a phishing scam—and stop bank impostors in their tracks. It starts with these four words: Banks Never Ask That. Because when you know what sounds suspicious, you’ll be less likely to be fooled. These top three phishing scams are full of red flags:

Text Message: If you receive a text message from someone claiming to be your bank asking you to sign in, or offer up your personal information, it’s a scam. Banks never ask that.

Email: Watch out for emails that ask you to click a suspicious link or provide personal information. The sender may claim to be someone from you bank, but it’s a scam. Banks never ask that.

Phone Call: Would your bank ever call you to verify your account number. No! Banks never ask that. If you’re ever in doubt that the caller is legitimate, just hang up and call the bank directly at a number you trust.

You’ve probably seen some of these scams before. But that doesn’t stop a scammer from trying. For more tips on how to keep phishing criminals at bay, including videos, an interactive quiz and more, visit http://www.BanksNeverAskThat.com. And be sure to share the webpage with your friends and family.

What’s Your Scam Score? Take five minutes to become a scamspotter pro by taking the #BanksNeverAskThat quiz at BanksNeverAskThat.com. Share your score on Twitter to encourage your friends and family to test their scam savviness, too. The more scamspotters out there, the harder it is for phishing criminals to catch their next victim!

October is National Cybersecurity Awareness Month, which means there’s no better time than now to boost your scamspotting knowledge. Take the five-minute quiz and become a scamspotter pro! Share your scam score on Twitter for a chance to win weekly prizes, courtesy of the American Bankers Association. Each Friday in October the ABA will draw fifteen winners. One lucky grand-prize winner will receive $1,000—will it be you?

Here For You: Beware Of Scams

These are confusing and challenging times for many Americans. Sadly, there are criminals out there who understand that trying times are the ideal conditions for scamming others. The IRS has provided us with some tips about current scams that we wanted to share with you.

  • Here for You BadgeRobocalls making fraudulent offers to sell respirator masks and other sought after supplies with intent of delivering.
  • Fake COVID-19 related apps and websites that install malware or ransomware.
  • Phishing emails asking for money or presenting malware.
  • Social media scams fraudulently seeking donations or claiming to provide stimulus funds.
  • Sales of fake testing kits, cures, immunity pills, and protective equipment from fraudulent sources and that requires the recipient to enter his or her bank account number.
  • Fraudulent offers for free COVID-19 testing in order to obtain Medicare beneficiary information that is used to submit false medical claims for unrelated unnecessary, or fictitious testing or services.
  • Prescription drug schemes involving the submission of medical claims for unnecessary antiretroviral treatments or other drugs that are marketing as purported cures for COVID-19.
  • Antiviral treatments or other drugs that are marketed as purported cures for COVID-19.
  • Scams involving the IRS Stimulus payments including calls from individuals attempting to obtain personal information. The IRS will not call, email, or text to verify payment details.

As your community bank, we want to remind you that if something sounds too good to be true, it probably is. Remember that your bank, local government, and IRS will not contact you to request your personal information, social security number or account information. We encourage you to be cautious, to ask questions and to safeguard your personal information.

If you feel that you have been victim to a scam, please notify the United States Attorney General.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

VCNB Offers The Scoop On Scams

Ice cream cone with extra scoops.jpgIt seems like scams are everywhere these days. From people knocking at your front door to threatening phone calls and harassing emails, it feels like there is constantly someone looking to swindle innocent people out of their money. Sadly, millions of Americans fall prey to scams every year.

That’s why we will host “Get the Scoop on Scams,” an informational session for senior citizens later this month. Jane Nickels, the Branch Manager of our McArthur office said her staff sees great need for this kind of education in the community. “Scams are everywhere and scammers are becoming increasingly sophisticated. Sometimes it’s hard to know who to trust and, as we get older, we are more likely to be targeted. We want to prepare seniors in our community with as much knowledge as we can,” Nickels explained.

This informational session will be held at the Vinton County Senior Citizens Center at 11 a.m. on Thursday, July 21. Registration is required and senior citizens may enjoy a tasty lunch for a donation to the Senior Center. Following the talk, the bank will have a free ice cream sundae bar for everyone to enjoy.

To take part, contact Rhoda at 740.596.4706 to guarantee your spot.

 

 

Protect Yourself From Scammers

Most people will be approached by a scammer at some time in their life. We warn children about “stranger danger” and to not take candy from or go with someone they don’t know. Yet many adults are quick to trust a stranger who contacts them with claims that a debit card has been compromised or that a small investment will earn them great returns.

At VCNB we will never contact you by phone, email or text and ask for personal financial information. If someone claiming to be from VCNB asks for your PIN, social security number or other personal information, do not give it to them.

And remember –

–  If it sounds too good to be true it usually is.

–  Get rich schemes only make the scammers rich. You will pay dearly. Never send money to someone you don’t know. If you are contacted electronically by a person you do know and they ask for money, verify that it is really your friend before reaching out to them electronically.

–  Check your bank and credit card statements for transactions you don’t recognize and notify the bank if there is something out of place.

–  Most of all, protect your personal information like it is your child. Never provide your account information, PIN, social security number or other personal data to an unknown source. Keep your cards in a safe place and don’t keep a written copy of your PIN or your account passwords with the card.

There are people out there who work hard at taking advantage of others. Be careful not to fall victim to their schemes. For more information click here for tips from USA.gov.